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Krey20

Sense and Sensibility

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... Then I saw the film version with Alan Rickman as Colonel Brandon and for the first time I thought - maybe Marianne fancies him because he's just, like, dead sexy ;)
I so see your point! :yumyum:

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I've recently re-read Sense and Sensibility so would like to contribute to this thread even though there's been a long gap since the previous post on it. On the Marianne-Brandon relationship, the reason why I feel some doubt is the terrific age discrepancy between them - he's old enough to be her father. As we don't know anything about Marianne's relationship with her own father it's not clear what is the basis for psychological plausibility other than the fact that she has lost him when she's still a teenager - perhaps that should be enough. I also wonder about Elinor's choice of Edward; we know why he's constrained but it's still hard to see what is attractive enough about him to make Elinor fall in love with him. On a different aspect, one of the things I like most about the novel is Austen's realism about Lucy Steele. Although she's conniving and spiteful, she ends up very socially successful - bad behaviour rewarded which is something few writers (or film-makers) would allow such female characters until very recently.

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As my mother was fond of commenting:

"The devil couldn't match 'em the way they match themselves!"

That's a very good one, Meg.

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I also wonder about Elinor's choice of Edward; we know why he's constrained but it's still hard to see what is attractive enough about him to make Elinor fall in love with him.
I don't know. I'm a boring fart with very few social skills but I still managed to find someone who fell in love with me...

 

Of course, she regrets it now. :)

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Have just read this for the first time and was really disappointed with it. I never really got a feel for Edward as almost everything we are told about him we get second hand.

Marianne irritated me - almost until the last page nothing seems to matter but her own feelings which, good or bad, she has to milk to the full. I'd have been happier if Elinor and Colonel Brandon had made a match of it.

I loved Pride and Prejudice and was expecting that level of immersion in the people and the values of the age and I just didn't feel it.

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I have to agree with you lucyb, it just doesn't have the same 'depth' as P & P - I have read most of her novel's and Sense and Sensibility is my least favourite. But then, who can compete with Mr Darcy? :)

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Just started reading this and I'm wondering which characters I'll like and which ones I won't. I've read four Jane Austens so far and I ended up getting really annoyed with at least one character per book. I guess that's the idea though - Austen's so good at portraying people's foibles and negative traits.

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Lucy B, I have to agree with you. I still love Sense & Sensibility a lot for Jane Austen's language and writing, for the characters she depicts so vividly. We all have our favourites and least favourites, I love Persuasion best but can't warm to Northanber Abbey much.

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Northanger Abbey is actually my favourite! That might be because I read it when I was 17, a bit dippy and obsessed with mystery novels, so I really identified with Catherine Morland. I wasn't so impressed with Pride and Prejudice or Emma, but the general consensus seems to be that those two are the best.

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I think it's nice that we all have our favourite Austen novel, shows that they are not all the same.

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