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Any good books??


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gloomygirl1313 16th March 2006 10:34 AM

 

Hi,

I am new and I joined hoping that I could find fellow readers who might have some good ideas for books to read.

I am a lover of all horror. I particularly love the days of your when the "scary" stories were not about now a-day topical or urban legend type stuff.

Give me a good old super natural boogie book like seed of evil where a creepy monster grew out of a plant and killed everyone in the house ... good weird horror.

Something unreal I can get sucked into.

A newer book or an older one I don't care something good.

I have read a lot of stuff so I am hoping to find some stuff I have never seen or heard of before. I would appreciate any suggestions

-Gloomy :thinking:

 

 

Adrian 16th March 2006 10:48 AM

 

I've just read Poppy Z. Brite's latest novels Liquor and Prime, and they've made me think about how good her earlier horror stories were. Exquisite Corpses is well worth checking out.

 

Loved your review of Cell.

 

 

 

Grammath 16th March 2006 01:44 PM

 

Hi, gloomygirl, welcome to BGO.

 

If you're looking for good old fashioned horror, might be worth going back to some of the 19th century source material. My own personal favourite is Edgar Allen Poe who, IMHO, is the most underrated writer of the 19th century and has been poorly served by modern adaptations of his work.

 

More recently, you could try '50s writer Richard Matheson, best known for post-apocolyptic vampire novel "I Am Legend". I think he also wrote a cracking haunted house book but I can't remember what it was called.

 

Also, several of us are reading Neil Gaiman's short story collection "Smoke and Mirrors" as March's choice for the BGO virtual book group at the moment, which contains several stories that might be just the sort of thing you are looking for.

 

Good luck in your search.

 

 

 

Hazel 16th March 2006 02:43 PM

 

More recently, you could try '50s writer Richard Matheson, best known for post-apocolyptic vampire novel "I Am Legend". I think he also wrote a cracking haunted house book but I can't remember what it was called.

 

Hell House?

 

 

Grammath 16th March 2006 05:10 PM

 

Could be! Certainly sounds like the right sort of title :P .

 

 

 

Flingo 17th March 2006 07:15 PM

 

His Lordship is currently reading a book called "Blood Crazy" by Simon Clark. It's a zombie horror thing, and he seems to be enjoying it.

 

 

 

LizzyBennet 18th March 2006 07:40 PM

 

I'd always recommend Stephen King to a horror fan, but you seem to be up on him already, so not much point! Also James Herbert's Once is pretty good, with a great story. Recently I've been reading Dean Koontz and he's impressed me with his characters, especially in The Taking. I love, love, love Clive Barker too - Abarat is great and unusual, and The Thief of Always is a quick read that has some gorgeous illustrations. These are my personal faves and you've probably read most of them already, but what the hell?! :)

 

 

 

Artegall 3rd September 2006 05:45 PM

 

The Oxford book of English Ghost Stories is a really good collection, and the classics deserved to be known as such - Dr Jekyll, Dracula, The Turn of the Screw are all brilliantly written, so if you've not got round to them they're worth a go. Susan Hill's The Woman in Black is a nice read too.

 

 

 

Paul 4th September 2006 09:40 AM

 

Hi There ...I'd recommend lots of good early horror like Edgar Allan Poe and H P Lovecraft. The whole spooky Chthulhu Mythos with writers like Ramsay Campbell and Clive Barker. Stephen King and James Herbert are worth a look.

 

My personal favourite is Brian Lumley - he followed on with the Lovecrafts Mythos with The Burrowers Beneath and some excellent short stories before writing Necroscope - and some excellent sequels. His Vampire history is well worth a look.

 

 

 

SERAFINApekkala 5th September 2006 04:15 PM

 

I am reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova & I must say it really is very good. It is a tad slow & pretty long (704 pages is long for me darling) but so far it is fantastic. Very eerie, about Dracula. You find yourself looking over your shoulder after reading a few chapters! It gives you that sort of uncomfortable feeling - but very good read.

 

Anyway, give it a go.

x

 

 

 

Flingo 11th September 2006 11:46 PM

 

Any one else got any more recommendations about Zombie books? So much horror seems to be vampire oriented, but that ain't what His Lordship likes.

 

I would be grateful for anything more that I could use to peak his interest!

 

 

 

Hazel 12th September 2006 01:16 PM

 

I know this is another vampire book - but Christopher Moore's Bloodsucking Fiends, got a good review in The Observer at the weekend. I have added it to my AWL.

 

 

 

pollyblue 19th September 2006 10:54 PM

 

undefined I think maybe you should try some Poppy Z Brite, Lost Souls is a good start, also Will Christopher Baer writes weird horror. If your looking for really stark reading you could try Bret Easton Ellis - Glamorama is a spooky book and also Ive just read a book called The House of Leaves which is excellent, really scary, really weird and hard to read but worth it.....

 

 

 

pollyblue 19th September 2006 11:01 PM

 

Hi Im new to this group,

 

Im an avid reader and love offbeat horror/underground/weirdness. Ive read a lot of Poppy Z Brite, Caitlin Kiernan and Will Christopher Baer. I have recently read a few Stephen King novels and was surprised that I actually liked them although prefer a book with a bit of a kink to it. Has anyone got any recommendations? Im sick of buying 3 quid pulp crime novels from the supermarket and need some inspiration!!

 

Becky

 

 

 

Paul 20th September 2006 09:41 AM

 

Hi there ... I'm a fan of the horror genre, there are some other threads on here with recommendations, but I'd suggest you take a look at Brian Lumley, Clive Barker and Ramsay Campbell.

 

I'd say have a look at James Herbert as well - his early stuff is worth investigating. If you want to delve into some older horror - Edgar Allan Poe is an obvious choice - but a major inspiration is H P Lovecraft and his Cthulhu Mythos ... creepy, under your skin horror!

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Hazel 20th September 2006, 10:40 AM

 

Christopher Moore's Bloodsucking Fiends, got a good review in The Guardian last weekend -

Amazon synopsis - Jody never asked to become a vampire. But when she wakes up under an alley Dumpster with a badly burned arm, an aching neck, superhuman strength, and a distinctly Nosferatuan thirst, she realises the decision has been made for her. Making the transition from the nine-to-five grind to an eternity of nocturnal prowlings is going to take some doing, however, and that's where C. Thomas Flood fits in. A would-be Kerouac from Incontinence, Indiana, Tommy (to his friends) is biding his time night-clerking and frozen turkey bowling in a San Francisco Safeway. But all that changes when a beautiful, undead redhead walks through the door ...and proceeds to rock Tommy's life - and afterlife - in ways he never imagined possible.

 

The cover looks rubbish though.

pollyblue 4th October 2006, 11:40 PM

I added Christopher Moore's Bloodsucking Fiends to my AWL last week after reading a good review in the Guardian. I am a sucker for vampire stories.

 

Like the sound of this, might have to go and buy it.....is it written by an American author? I have a preference for American fiction

Hazel 5th October 2006, 09:23 AM

Originally Posted by pollyblue

Like the sound of this, might have to go and buy it.....is it written by an American author? I have a preference for American fiction

 

I think he is American, and comes highly recommended by Carl Hiaasen (?). I received the book the other day but haven't gotten round to reading it yet, but if the Guardian Review of it is anything to go by it should be a good one. Mind you, they also recommended Smith's The Accidental which in actual fact was dog poo.

 

 

megustaleer 30th October 2006, 03:56 PM

I have merged two threads here, as they seemed to be covering the same ground.

Nollaig 14th January 2007, 08:23 AM

 

You might like 'Sunshine' by Robin McKinley

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For an alternative to the usual horror writers, Jeff Long is a good read for horror/thriller. The Descent, Year Zero and The Reckoning are all good reads. He has also recently brought out a sequel to The Descent - Deeper, but I haven't managed to nab a copy of that yet.

 

Amazon seems to have copies of The Descent for as little as £1.06

 

Or £1.16 for The Reckoning

 

And Year Zero starting from £0.01

 

The above links are direct to Amazon, but if anyone should wish to order them I'd suggest ordering them through the BGO Amazon links so that the site earns the fee for them.

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For an alternative to the usual horror writers, Jeff Long is a good read for horror/thriller. The Descent, Year Zero and The Reckoning are all good reads. He has also recently brought out a sequel to The Descent - Deeper, but I haven't managed to nab a copy of that yet.

 

Amazon seems to have copies of The Descent for as little as £1.06

 

Or £1.16 for The Reckoning

 

And Year Zero starting from £0.01

 

The above links are direct to Amazon, but if anyone should wish to order them I'd suggest ordering them through the BGO Amazon links so that the site earns the fee for them.

 

OK, thanks for that. Much appreciated.

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Can anyone recommend a good author of ghost stories? I've read 'The Woman in Black' and absolutely loved it so I want something along the same lines. I also read Susan Hill's 'The Man in the Picture' which was good but no where near on a par with WiB...

 

I want a Victorianesque book, all crackling fires, gaslights and fog...

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I want a Victorianesque book, all crackling fires, gaslights and fog...

Charles Dickens, The Haunted House

Henry James, The Turn of the Screw

M.R James collections

Wilkie Collins

Sheridan Le Fanu, In A Glass Darkly

 

Modern ones don't really have that 'around the fire' quality.

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Thanks Hazel- which is the best for reading out loud, proper spooky, chills down the spine ghost stories?
Oooh, I just remembered The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson - that is exactly what you are looking for JD. You must get that.

 

And as for the best of the bunch previously mentioned, I'd go for the Henry James.

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I have less idea about Horror books cause i am still childish scared of spirits and ghosts and where zombies stupidity type of books i read look all useless to me i was scared every time when i use to pass away from the shelf of Horror Books in my High School Library lol.I tried to read 1 or 2 but couldn't bring them to end.I wish some can help me out that from which Horror stories i should start ? Please.

 

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Life's too short! 6ea2ef7311b482724a9b7b0bc0dd85c6.gif

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I know people have already mentioned Richard Matheson but if you want something easily digestible then I highly recommend him. Richard Laymon is good fun but a little childish and strangely twisted at the same time.

 

Edgar Allen Poe is obviously going to come out on top. If you liked The Turn of the Screw and don’t mind something less subtle then you’ll love Poe.

I recently read a great book called ‘The Terror’ (yeah I know, but it’s referring to HMS Terror) by Dan Simmons. It’s about two navy ships that get trapped in the Arctic ice, and people start going missing . . .

 

The only time I’ve ever got nightmares after reading a book was from the dream bits in Crime and Punishment. I’m not sure why but that really got to me.

 

The only original suggestion I can think of is ‘Nocturnes’ by John Connolly, a collection of creepy short stories – most of which are excellent in my opinion.

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Well, I have to say that H G Wells scared me, The War of The Worlds especially. M R James I enjoyed but didn't scare me although it did have that lovely victorian feel, and the only book that I ever had nightmares about was Killing for Company: Case of Dennis Nilsen by Brian Masters, which isn't fiction.

 

I did feel that Jekyll and Hyde was scary the first time that I read it, but I generally can't get past Stephen King for spine-chilling.

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