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Lulu 6th December 2004 06:16 PM

 

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Twisted: Collected Stories of Jeffery Deaver: vol1 - Jeffery Deaver

 

New York Times bestselling author Jeffery Deaver has long thrilled fans with tales of masterful villains and their nefarious ways, and the brilliant minds who bring them to justice. Now the author of the Lincoln Rhyme series has collected his award-winning, spine-tingling stories of suspense -- stories that will widen your eyes and stretch your imagination.

 

The Twisted stories include Without Jonathan, The Weekender, For Services Rendered, Eye to Eye, Beautiful, The Fall Guy, Triangle, and The Christmas Present which brings back Jeffery Deaver's most beloved character -- criminalist Lincoln Rhyme -- to solve a chilling Christmastime disappearance.

 

Diverse, provocative, eerie and inspired, this collection of Jeffery Deaver's best stories exhibits the amazing range and signature plot twists that have earned him the title "master of ticking-bomb suspense" by People. With nods to O. Henry and Edgar Allan Poe, these beautifully crafted pieces pulse with subtle intrigue and Deaver's incomparable imagination.

 

 

 

Ian Rowland 17th December 2004 08:12 PM

 

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This is a comprehensively stunning set of short stories, and a superb showcase for one impressively talented writer. I give the book my fullest recommendation, and I'd give anyone a 100%, gold-plated, copper-bottomed, triple-A, can't-miss guarantee that to own this book is to enjoy it, love it and be mesmerised in the most enjoyable way by the author's invention, style and mastery of the genre. Deaver is a craftsman with talent to burn, and if you like short crime stories with the 'twist' then this is the finest modern collection you can get your hands on. There is one duff story in the bunch - a curious excursion into Elizabthan England which mis-fires in just about every way - but that's a small and forgiveable flaw in a collection otherwise overflowing with gems and treasures.

 

When I'd finished it, I was very disappointed to discover that this is, so far, Deaver's only collection of short stories, and since he doesn't write them often (quality takes time) we'll have to wait a while before there's another. Ah well, here's waiting...

 

My Friend Jack 6th January 2005 01:26 PM

 

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Ian - thanks for the recommendation, I will keep an eye out for this. I have read one of the Lincoln Rhyme stories - can't recall the title, but it involved an illusionist. I quite enjoyed it, although I found it a little far-fetched (nothing wrong with that, most of the stuff I read is sci-fi and fantasy, after all!).

 

Ian Rowland 14th January 2005 01:27 AM

 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by My Friend Jack

I have read one of the Lincoln Rhyme stories - can't recall the title, but it involved an illusionist.

 

That was probably 'The Vanished Man'. I'd give it 5 out of 10, and I have to say Deaver's research as regards my own trade (deception and illusion) left a lot to be desired. The 'Twisted' collection of short stories is much better, 10 out of 10 and then some.

 

My Friend Jack 14th January 2005 09:08 AM

 

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Thanks again, Ian - yes it was The Vanished Man. The bits where the killer avoided detection by wearing clothes that matched the walls of the room he was in (am I remembering this right?) were the bits I referred to as far-fetched. Perhaps you could comment - I'm interested as to whether such a technique would really work - I might buy myself a magnolia suit so as to avoid having to tidy up after dinner... ;)

 

Royal Rother 23rd March 2006 10:55 AM

 

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I've only read The Bone Collector from Deaver but thought it was excellent and have him very much in mind for some forthcoming holiday reading, so will look out for this. One complete story a night in the balmy Florida evenings will go down very well with a beer and a cigar or two....

 

Note: I haven't seen this thread before (despite its age) probably due to the fact it's surely in the wrong forum.

 

Should this not be moved to Crime?

 

(Love the magnolia suit quip....) :D

 

megustaleer 2nd May 2006 07:53 PM

 

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'Twisted' and other books

 

Posts copied from other threads:

13/12/04

Quote:

Originally Posted by barbara

Someone introduced me to Deaver and he is gripping but I found the Bone Collector had a far fetched ending, his Maidens Grave was good though.

 

 

12/04/05

Quote:

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

 

The Bone Collector - Jeffery Deaver

 

My first of his and I'm enjoying it. I do like forensic investigations and the like, very interesting. Rhyme is a very unusual "hero", and might well become even more intriguing than Rebus and Bosch. I'll certainly follow up on this series.

 

17/04/06

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hazel

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bookreader jackie

7) The Bone Collector ~ Deaver****

 

Ooh that is one of my favourite thrillers - have you read Deaver's other fab one The Coffin Dancer? It is even better!

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bookreaderjackie

 

The Bone Collector is the only book I have read by Jeffrey Deaver. I have a couple of others on my TBR pile but not that one. I'll have a look at the library and see if they have got it.

 

 

24/04/06

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donnae

Because of BGO member comments, went off to the library today to find The Bone Collector by Jeffery Deaver. Success...started reading it this afternoon. Wow, what a beginning!

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hazel

If you like that one, you MUST try The Coffin Dancer by Deaver - it is even better!

 

 

26/04/06

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donnae

Hi Hazel,

I am now about 100 pages in, and just about to lose myself back in it again this morning.

 

I see that there are a few Lincoln Rhyme stories, is The Coffin Dancer the next in the series, or doesn't it matter what order they are read in?

 

 

27/04/06

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hazel

The only things that have a continuing plot line is Lincoln's condition and progress, and his relationship with Amelia Sachs. I have read all of them up to The Vanished Man and stopped as they were getting a little tired. I sold most of them but kept The Bone Collector and The Coffin Dancer. But CD for my money, is definitely the best.

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Royal Rother 3rd May 2006 03:35 PM

 

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Excellent moderating Meg!

 

megustaleer 3rd May 2006 03:51 PM

 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

Excellent moderating Meg!

 

Thanks! It's a pity I couldn't get them in date order, 'though! :rolleyes:

Perhaps I'll do better moving the ones that need to go onto the short-story forum! (assuming we get one!)

 

Hazel 3rd May 2006 04:25 PM

 

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I read Twisted a few years ago, and actually don't remember liking it very much. I also recall reading a interview with Deaver at the same time as this colection came out and he said that the tales in the collection were all ideas he couldn't bring to novel length so decided to make them short stories instead. It kind of shows. They start out with steam and bluster and kind of ended unconvincingly. The Elizabethan one was cringe inducing. Really put me off Deaver - though I will stand by my recommendation for Coffin Dancer and The Bone Collector - 2 of the best modern crime books around.

 

donnae 3rd May 2006 11:52 PM

 

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Finished The Bone Collector and thoroughly enjoyed it.

 

I don't often read thrillers but I want to check out some of Deaver's other books (The Coffin Dancer will be next, thank you Hazel :) ) and have also remembered that I have a couple of Harlan Coben's books on a bookshelf somewhere.

 

Part way into the book, I remembered that I had seen the film! The book, of course, is much better. I can't remember there being as much historical detail of New York in the film, and this was really interesting in the book.

 

I liked the interaction between Rhyme and Sachs both on the personal and professional levels. I also liked how the victims were introduced to the reader as people and that you got to know and care about what happened to them (although for some, not for very long!).

 

 

Spoiler:

Although it is a little while since I have watched the film, I actually think that the murderer in the film is different to the book. I was really pleased about this because at least I didn't know the ending and the murderer in the book had more plausible reasons for involving Rhyme.

 

donnae 25th July 2006 04:10 PM

 

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Hazel,

I was just browsing through The Sunday Times Culture section and see that Jeffery Deaver was at a Waterstones in Glasgow yesterday. Did you go to see him?

 

Donna

 

Hazel 25th July 2006 04:32 PM

 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by donnae

Hazel,

I was just browsing through The Sunday Times Culture section and see that Jeffery Deaver was at a Waterstones in Glasgow yesterday. Did you go to see him?

 

Donna

 

 

 

No I didn't, I didn't even know he was there. Although I am not a fan of his now I could have gone and told him how good CD and TBC are. Must think about getting the Sunday Times now though! The Observer/Guardian didn't even mention this at the weekend!

 

megustaleer 25th July 2006 09:21 PM

 

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He was on the radio in the week, too. He must have a book to sell!

 

Granny weatherwax 25th July 2006 09:36 PM

 

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He does have a book to sell he was in Cambridge last week too, I went along and got my book signed, he's a really nice chap :)

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Royal Rother

The Books of Jeffery Deaver

 

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I have only read The Bone Collector until now and I enjoyed that hugely.

 

I am now most of the way through A Maiden's Grave which features a Hostage Negotiation.

 

A group of deaf children and their teachers are taken hostage by a group of 3 escaped prisoners and the FBI's top man is called upon to bring together a team and the technology required to negotiate the release of the hostages.

 

I am finding hugely enjoyable (again) and a fascinating insight into what really happens in these situations. The considerations that go into the communications between negotiator and Hostage Takers, the psychology at play between all the parties, the whole way in which the crisis is handled is brilliantly told. It is also interesting to get some insight into the lives of the profoundly deaf.

 

I have told Mrs RR, if she's getting me books for Christmas, just line a few Jeffery Deaver up - they will be well appreciated!

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#2 28th November 2006, 12:50 PM

Kats

Member Join Date: Apr 2005

Location: London

Posts: 42

 

 

 

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A Maiden's Grave was the first Jeffrey Deaver I read and it had me hooked right from the start.

 

I've since read The Bone Collector, The Coffin Dancer, Hell's Kitchen and Garden of Beasts. I can't praise his books highly enough. I went through a stage where I talked of little else to my friends when we were talking about books.

 

Hugely enjoyable books, but as you say, they're also utterly fascinating.

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#3 28th November 2006, 01:04 PM

My Friend Jack

Moderator Join Date: Dec 2004

Location: Over the hill and far far away

Posts: 2,118

 

 

 

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I'm sure I have read at least one, but darned if I can remember anything about it. I will have a quick delve into my shelves and see what I can find...

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#4 28th November 2006, 01:07 PM

My Friend Jack

Moderator Join Date: Dec 2004

Location: Over the hill and far far away

Posts: 2,118

 

 

 

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...nope, it must have been more than 2 years ago. I'll do a google and see what I come up with...

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#5 28th November 2006, 01:10 PM

My Friend Jack

Moderator Join Date: Dec 2004

Location: Over the hill and far far away

Posts: 2,118

 

 

 

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...got it! The Vanished Man. Maybe I just started with the wrong book, but the impression I have now, looking back, is that the story / characters / setting were all totally implausible!

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#6 28th November 2006, 03:28 PM

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident Join Date: Jun 2005

Location: Sunny Glasgow, Scotland

Posts: 2,529

 

 

 

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I used to read pretty much all of Deaver's Books, especially the Lincoln Rhyme series. I think the last one I read was The Vanished Man, but I grew really bored of the series and eventually stopped buying his books. I sold all my Deaver books, but I have hung onto The Coffin Dancer which was definitely his finest moment.

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#7 Yesterday, 02:34 PM

Royal Rother

Founder Member Join Date: Dec 2004

Posts: 1,186

 

 

 

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Finished A maiden's Grave last night. It kept me gripped all the way through although I did see the twists at the end before they happened. Maybe I was supposed to.

 

Well that's 2 of Deaver's books I've read now and both have been excellent. Maybe I'll avoid The Vanished Man....

__________________

 

#8 Yesterday, 03:33 PM

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident Join Date: Jun 2005

Location: Sunny Glasgow, Scotland

Posts: 2,529

 

 

 

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Definitely make The Coffin Dancer your next one.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was sure I had posted here a long time ago but it must be among the MIA's.

 

I first got into Deaver when on holiday I picked up an American RD condensed book that had The Devil's Teardrop among the stories. I loved it so much I could hardly wait to find a bookshop to buy more of his books.

 

The film version of The Bone Collector has one of the most heartstopping scenes in, to me at least. The shot of the rat jumping onto the still alive man, to eat his face, still scares me rigid.

 

I like the Lincoln Rhyme books but have read some of the others which I also enjoyed but LR is my fave.

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  • 4 months later...

I'm a fan of Jeffrey Deaver.

 

Don't avoid The Vanished Man - it's one of his best IMHO.

 

One of the things that I do like about JD is that many of his books show a positive portrayal of disabled characters, which is something that I find sadly lacking from a lot of modern literature.

 

He's coming to my local Waterstone's in August to plug his latest hardback - I may be there :cool:

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One of the things that I do like about JD is that many of his books show a positive portrayal of disabled characters, which is something that I find sadly lacking from a lot of modern literature.

 

 

Do you think that's really true? After all, Lincoln Rhyme is pretty miserable most of the time and frequently considers giving up and killing himself. Admittedly as the books progress he becomes more accepting of his position, but still to consider him a positive portrayal is stretching the label a little.

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Do you think that's really true? After all, Lincoln Rhyme is pretty miserable most of the time and frequently considers giving up and killing himself. Admittedly as the books progress he becomes more accepting of his position, but still to consider him a positive portrayal is stretching the label a little.

 

I think that's a fairly accurate portrayal of someone who has undergone a life-changing experience that has limited them to the extent that Lincoln Rhyme's accident did.

 

What's positive about the Lincoln Rhyme books is that, despite his physical limitations, he is still portrayed as a valuable person with skills and experience that should not be dismissed as, sadly, often happens to disabled people.

 

A Maiden's Grave is another good example.

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What's positive about the Lincoln Rhyme books is that, despite his physical limitations, he is still portrayed as a valuable person with skills and experience that should not be dismissed as, sadly, often happens to disabled people.

 

That is very true, I agree. But then he seems to be quite an exceptional person disabled or not.

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  • 1 year later...

The Sleeping Doll - majoring on a character who has appeared in Deaver's books before with Lincoln Rhyme, namely Kathryn Dance.

 

Her field of expertise is kinesics and it is very interesting to see how this science (?) is used to understand what is going on in another person's mind and body. It might have been slightly overdone in this novel, a bit too much emphasis on kinesics (the word must have been used 100 times) but I found it very enjoyable.

 

Kinesics is the interpretation of body language such as facial expressions and gestures — or, more formally, non-verbal behavior related to movement, either of any part of the body or the body as a whole.

 

I do enjoy Deaver's writing, particularly the way he takes us right inside his very nasty villains' heads (showing a brief sympathetic angle on their character) but, having read 4 or 5 now, find his style rather repetitive. He loves to lead the reader down certain paths which prove misleading (or complete dead ends) and does it several times in every book, so much so that you just don't believe any of his set ups in the end. Also, there will always be at least 1 massive twist / surprise in the long, drawn-out denouement.

 

Still, I liked The Sleeping Doll a lot; I just wouldn't want to read another of his for a good while.

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    • By Pannx
      I was surprised not to see Jeffery Deaver on here already. He is really good. If you have ever watched the film of 'The Bone Collector', put that out of your mind, and read some of his stuff. If you find that you are often able to guess whodunnit before the end of the book, then Deaver's for you! He'll keep you guessing in the good ole traditional ways of rhetoric. Saying that, there are two which are suspect - one is The Blue Nowhere, the other is Garden of Beasts.
       
      Go for The Bone Collector (if you've not seen the film), the Coffin Dancer and Praying for Sleep.
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