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Krey20

JPod

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Cathy

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JPod

 

Has anyone read this yet?

 

It was reviewed on Newsnight review on Friday (run to the hills!!!). Lionel Shriver (who I'm not a fan of) said 'Its so pre-9/11'... which makes me defensive and want to go straight out and buy it!

 

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katrina

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Not read it or heard of it, who wrote it?? And why do some authors feel that everything has to reflect 9/11? It was a huge event and changed the world for sure but not everything has to refer to it

 

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Cathy

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Its by Douglas Coupland. I'm a big fan though I haven't loved everything so I can't really defend it before I've read it.

 

Yeah I thought that comment was really weird. Maybe after I get hold of it that will make more sense. I can't think what being 'so pre 9/11' even really means because we didn't know we were being pre-9/11 till it happened...

 

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angel

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I haven't read it, but I remember it got a good review, when Douglas Coupland was interviewed on Radio 4 (I think it was Front Row June 1st). I took note because our youngest daughter and her boyfriend are big fans. What came strongly from the interview was that he writes for the present climate and that although he felt Generation X, depicting the 'whatever' geration - comfortable, Twenty-something sons and daughters of post-war parents - was apt when written, he would not write that now.

 

He talked about how, as a writer, he used to spend hours in the reference section of his library, but that, now of course most people use google. He said 'Jpod' is about our present twenty-something googlers.

 

I was intrigued by the pages of prime numbers where one has to find the one non-prime and other similar tests (I don't think this needs a spoiler as he talked openly about the puzzles).

 

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Cathy

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

That sounds really interesting, about what he's trying to capture. I'm not sure I can be bothered with puzzles though! I'm re-reading Generation X right now partly because of seeing this new book reviewed and partly because its one of my favourite books. I wonder why if he's addressing more up-to-date stuff Shriver found it dated?

 

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Mungus

Subscriber

 

The reviews I read seemed to describe it as an updated but very similar story to Generation X, which I haven't read and I think might now be dated. I don't think either reviewer was impressed - I read The Guardian and The Observer - and I haven't been inspired to add it to my mental TBR library list.

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I've recently read this and was blown away by it. It's the first time I've read anything by Coupland and it definetly won't be the last.

 

It's basically about a few people working in the computer industry that like their job but find it too easy so they invent increasingly strange activities and habits to distract themselves from their work. I think that's why I connected wth it so much.

 

Coupland writing matches my own sense of humour, he basically communicates in various degrees is sarcasm.

 

Undoubtly, people will say that Coupland is making a serious social statement, which is true. It's about clever people wasting their talents. Having said that, this element can be ignored if you just want to be entertained.

 

If you are easily annoyed by puzzles, wordplay and "page wasting" gimmicks, this book will drive you crazy.

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Douglas Coupland ia great writer and this time he even makes an appearance in his own book.

 

Jpod revolves around a central character and his close friends and family. Whilst the main character works in software (not a great departure for Coupland) its the side stories that make this particularly interesting. If you've never read Coupland before then you will find the layout of his books unusual - I don't see it as "page wasting gimmicks" but think it reflects Coupland's art combining with his writing - make up your own mind

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Im a massive fan of Coupland, and i almost forgot this book was out - i need to check it out!

 

Girlfriend in a coma blew my mind, as did Hey Nostrodamus. the latter hit me more personally, ive read it numerous times - cant recommend it highly enough if you like his stuff.

 

I remember reading Life after God - a book of short stories first of all, and vividly remember crying on the train reading it! Girlfriend.. and ..Nostrodamus also had me blubbing like a baby. Any writer who has the power to do that I always love. I agree that not all of his novels have the same effect, but look forward to reading J pod.

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it's not my fave coupland book by any means, but still worthy of investigation.

when it's funny it's very funny, and when it isn't... zzzzzz!

POND

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Just finished JPod, very enjoyable, although not my fave Coupland. Didnt have much of an emotional impact, like a lot of his other novels. Still I would recommend it, very imaginative, very funny, and classic Coupland. The idea at the end was absolute genius I must admit!! One of those great ideas you can definitely see happening in the future!

 

just started Eleanor Rigby!

 

peace

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Thanks for posting that soundsofibis.

I look forward to seeing your thoughts on Eleanor Rigby. There isn't a thread for that, yet, so perhaps you could start one when you have read it...if no-one's beaten you to it :rolleyes:

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Just re-read this, and I still absolutely love it!

I especially enjoy Coupland's own little cameos in it, and the way he satirises the way some of his past work is now seen.

 

I agree doesn't have the emotional impact of some of his other books, but his wit is sharper for it.

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