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The Very Hungry Caterpillar


Bill
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This much-loved classic picture book follows the caterpillar's week while he eats through a range of foods in preparation for his hibernation and subsequent appearance as a beautiful butterfly.

 

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  • 1 month later...

This was probably my youngest daughter's favourite story for a couple of years. I think she enjoyed reading it to me more. It's brilliant for the colours, the counting, and just generally good fun. And the caterpillar turns into such a beautiful butterfly. Oops, I have spoilt the ending now :)

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I think this is a wonderful book. I included it in my top ten books (here if anyone hasn't voted yet). As an introduction to the world of books for small children you really can't get any better. Behind the sheer charm and simplicity are all the fundamental elements of 'a good book': a good plot (no, but really it is), education, humour, engagement. It engages the child both physically (the holes) and mentally and yet doesn't patronise. Genius.

 

Awww, it's made me remember reading it to my boy when he was wee. Awash with nostalgia now.

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When my first grandson was born, 8weeks premature and 'small for dates', my son used to sit by the incubator reading 'The Very Hungry Caterpillar' to this tiny little creature.

 

Apparantly it is considered as inspirational reading for premmies!

That is such a nice picture! I do hope your grandson is thriving and eating lots of salami/leaves/cakes himself now?

It's got me thinking aboutthe power of story-telling and it's capacity to bond people, whether oral or written, and how this basic form of communication is managing to survive in this technological age. For example, on the way to work the other day I was thinking about the sheer amount of information I am expected to digest, process, store and then interpret for another audience etc etc . The thought of reading Hungry Caterpilla to a teeny prem baby seems so much more appealing and worthwhile.

 

:)

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  • 3 weeks later...

There is something about this book that stands the test of time. Just the other day we were discussing favourite books at work and one of my Austrailian colleagues immediately mentioned this one! I can recall reading it when I was small and so did my younger sister, I'm now going to buy it for my friend's daughters 2nd birthday, what goes around, comes around! Aah happy memories!! :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I loved it and all my kids have loved it. It is currently one of my dd's favourite books so I am always getting it lobbed my way for another read through. She is 20m old and I am delighted to see another bookworm in the making...

 

My mum says it was one of the first books she saw which had done anything 'different' with it's pages other than just being normal pages.

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  • 1 year later...

Rescued Thread:

 

#12

3rd August 2006, 10:37 AM

PinkyWolfy

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Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Derbyshire

Posts: 71

 

This is such a gorgeous book! Makes me kind of sad that I have nobody to read it to - can't understand why my 13 year old daughter really doesn't want this as a bedtime story any more!

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#13

3rd August 2006, 11:08 AM

Hazel

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My 5 year old still likes this book, but the 20 month old just wants to stick his fingers through it and it is impossible to read to him. Just now My 5 year olds favourite book is Room on a Broom by Julia Donaldson.

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#14

3rd August 2006, 12:08 PM

katrina

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Location: chelmford, england

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I remember this book so well, all those gorgeous coloured pages and the holes

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#15

3rd August 2006, 07:45 PM

Momo

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***

Quote:

Originally Posted by PinkyWolfy

This is such a gorgeous book! Makes me kind of sad that I have nobody to read it to - can't understand why my 13 year old daughter really doesn't want this as a bedtime story any more!

***

 

You're right, it's kind of sad when your kids don't want those children's books any more. I either read them myself or - help at school, either with reading or at the book fairs they do. That way you get a lot of "fresh" kids, especially some whose parents don't read to them. And it's fun.

Oh, and I loved this book - and others by Eric Carle - a lot, as well.

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and the 2nd of 2 pages:

 

Royal Rother 3rd August 2006 08:01 PM

 

Each of my 3 have had this as a favourite bedtime story during their childhood.

 

For when we're feeling lazy we even have a cassette that tells the story with music. (B side is just the music. Nice soothing bedtime music. Ideal.)

 

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Flingo 3rd August 2006 09:09 PM

 

They have been reprinting many of Eric Carle's books recently. Unfortunately, a lot of them have not stood the test of time as well as this, and they look dated and tired. I'm not sure that the children they are aimed at mind too much though!

 

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Momo 3rd August 2006 10:52 PM

 

When my youngest son was in Year 2, his teacher had them make pictures à la Eric Carle. They all loved doing them and then they went and read most of his books. And they all loved them.

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  • 11 months later...
It was the holes that used to fascinate me - and it is the holes that I still remember. And that is odd because, when you think about it, they didn't even exist.
How do you mean? There is actual holes in the fruit in my copy...unless you mean existentially? ;)
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  • 8 months later...
  • 1 year later...

I am looking forward to buying a copy in the next few months. Our first grandchild is due early next year and my son (the expectant father) loved this book as a child - and still does I believe!! His copy seems to have disappeared during several moves in his life-time.

 

I have to admit that I never expected it to remain so popular over so many years. It just shows that quality will stand the test of time through several generations.

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