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Lulu

Digital Fortress

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When the National Security Agency’s invincible code-breaking machine encounters a mysterious code it cannot break, the agency calls in its head cryptographer, Susan Fletcher, a brilliant, beautiful mathematician. What she uncovers sends shock waves through the corridors of power. The NSA is being held hostage – not by guns or bombs, but by a code so complex that if released would cripple U.S. intelligence.

 

Caught in an accelerating tempest of secrecy and lies, Fletcher battles to save the agency she believes in. Betrayed on all sides, she finds herself fighting not only for her country but for her life, and in the end, for the life of the man she loves…

 

RRP: £6.99, <a href ="http://www.thebookplace.com/bookplace/spring2005.asp?CID=BGO733" TARGET="_blank">The Book Pl@ce</a> Price: £4.89

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I read this after reading Angels and Demons and the Da Vinci Code, so I had quite high expectations but I found it quite predictable, and the characters didn't come off quite as well, I think Robert Langdon is an easier character to get to know.

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His books follow the same pattern lol (I do love them though). I've just finished Digital Fortress and guessed striaght away who the guilty party was, Susan Fletcher was a bit dim.

 

One thing that has to be said though, Dan Brown has a thing for all the women he writes into his stories, half his books are dedicated to how wonderful they are. Vittoria needed a slap to be honest. His male characters he has less love for, apart from the main who is usually also an attractive thirty something. This one line that popped up in the middle of the chase scene made me laugh out loud: "Becker thanked God that his daily squash routine involved twenty minutes on the Nautilus machine to develop his biceps for a harder overhead serve." It was just so...I don't know lol.

 

I was also quite smug I managed to get what Tankado's message was while the charaters were still dithering. I know it's sad to get smug over fictional characters who all only dithering to increase the tension. :D

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