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Bill

The Da Vinci Code

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I am just about finished reading the DVC, and in common with many posters here, I think it was ok. nothing special, and has all been done before (and better). Having said all that I also agree that not every body is a literary expert, myself included, and I think it is rather sniffy of those literary snobs that condemn the average reader for liking this. As for the reason that this book has sold so many copies , might it be something to do with clever marketing??? and all the hype, and to be honest the vast majority of people seem to love a conspiracy. I did not particularly like Dan Browns style of writing, too simplistic and unimaginitive for my taste, but I agree if this gets people reading then that is to be applauded.

 

And in common with a lot of the posters I now want to go and find out more about some of the themes raised in this novel. So all is not lost.

 

And lets face it, with that many sales, Dan Brown will never have to worry about money ,will he?. Good on him! I would bet that a good few of the literary snobs favourite authors probably died in poverty.

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, Dan Brown will never have to worry about money ,will he?. Good on him! I would bet that a good few of the literary snobs favourite authors probably died in poverty.

 

Is this supposed to be the standard that writers should aspire to?

 

Is it better to spend your life writing over-hyped dross and make oodles of money than turn out really well crafted quality literature that brings in only a small monetary reward, and posthumous recognition? (Not to say that quality, fame and money need be mutually exclusive!)

 

(This isn't a comment on Dan Brown's books, as I haven't read any, but a reaction to the quote above)).

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Is this supposed to be the standard that writers should aspire to?

 

Is it better to spend your life writing over-hyped dross and make oodles of money than turn out really well crafted quality literature that brings in only a small monetary reward, and posthumous recognition? (Not to say that quality, fame and money need be mutually exclusive!)

 

(This isn't a comment on Dan Brown's books, as I haven't read any, but a reaction to the quote above)).

 

 

Touched a nerve here? Just expressing an opinion, I wasn't making any kind of judgement. After all, and I have said this before and stand by it, books, like every thing else in life come down to a question of personal taste, and just because something does not appeal to you personally, it does not make it right/wrong or good/bad. I was under the impression that this is what this entire forum was about, expressing ones opinions. I freely admit that I am no literary genius, and as such, read books that some would likely not lower their intellect reading, but hey, it's free country. And, I don't think there is anything noble in starving for your art.

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Touched a nerve here?

 

Yeah, I suppose it did.

I hate the way that nothing these days is considered to have any worth unless it can be expressed in monetary terms.

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Yeah, I suppose it did.

I hate the way that nothing these days is considered to have any worth unless it can be expressed in monetary terms.

 

 

I never said that this was a 'worthy' novel because it has made cartloads of money, or for any other reason. In fact if you read the whole post you may notice that I didn't think much of it at all. All I was really saying was that Dan Brown is successful and probably very wealthy and he has done something I will never do. That in itself is to be applauded.

 

The fact that this book and countless others like it are read by millions of different people does not prove or disprove the greatness (or not) of the books, it only proves that people read them! and at the end of the day that is what books are for. As for 'great literary works' the vast majority of which Joe Public are unaware, surely it is better that people read anything, than read nothing at all. We can't all be intellectuals. And one final point, if we all liked the same books, pictures, clothes etc. etc. etc. what a dreary old world this would be, and this whole forum thing would not exist.

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I haven't read the book but agree with your sentiments entirely Deirdre.

 

There is room for all styles of literature, and whilst it may unfortunate that the richest authors are never (?) those with the greatest literary merit, the reason for writing books is usually to get them read, and anyone who does that successfully deserves respect as long as they don't do it at someone else's expense.

 

Hmmm, mind you, I hate The Sun....

 

I'm going to go and have a think now....

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I think the thing about the DVC is that it grips you from the word go and keeps you there until the end. So much so that you do not realise the real shortcomings in the writer's actual literary ability until you think back. It works so can you blame Mr Brown for going with it. Movie fodder Vs Classic literature - who's the winner?

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I've been lurking on these forums since December 2004 and it's time to come clean.

 

I like the DVC. I thought it was a great piece of entertaining literature.

 

Go ahead, flame away, I'll go back into hiding for the next 7 months!!!

 

Stephen

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I'm with you Stephen, I thought the DVC was very entertaining. The suspense even got me reading secretly during class. However I found the ending to be quite anti-climatic. did anyone else feel the same? :o

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I'm with you Stephen, I thought the DVC was very entertaining. The suspense even got me reading secretly during class. However I found the ending to be quite anti-climatic. did anyone else feel the same? :o

Sort of, but how else could it have ended? The revelation and the shock was in the subject matter, not in the conclusion. It's not the world's best ending, but its hard to think how it could have ended better. I thought the subtleties of the love interest that had been bubbling under throughout were nicely concluded without being too forced. Considering Dan Brown's reportage style of writing, I was shuddering to imagine there might have been a love scene later on, described using his usual direct and hollow prose. "There was an arousal. It was gradual." etc etc.

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I enjoyed reading The Da Vinci Code, but after I had finished it I didn't feel fulfilled ( :confused: if that's the right word) like I have with other books. Thought some of the theories in it were really interesting.

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If you liked THE DAVINCI CODE, be sure to get THE GRAIL CONSPIRACY in Sept. It is not the same story at all but all those kinds on intriguing elements are in there. You can check it out at http://www.grailconspiracy.com and read the first chapter. It can be preordered now. The site has research links and authors bios as well and book news, where the authors are appearing. Check it out. If you have questions you can write the authors at info@grailconspiracy.com

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so nice to see I'm not the only one who read this and wondered why it has sold so many copies, thought it was contrived, and dull. stuck with it till the end hoping it would get better - it didn't and it was pretty easy to figure out who the teacher was and the people in the cottage...

 

However, expect it will make a pretty film with lots of scenes of beautiful paris...and give some wrinkly actor the chance to kiss a beautiful young actress. ;)

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Find it difficult in some ways to see how this book can be seen as contrived and dull - it is a while since I read the book but - what about all the theories about the early church suppressing females - I find that absolutely fascinating having been brought up catholic - why do we assume men should take such a dominant role in the Christian (among other) religion? I'm nowhere near an out-an-out feminist, but an equal role for both sexes in religion seems to make so much more sense - so even just for that perspective I found it thought provoking.

Perhaps, Chornayakoshka, you were aware of all the theories/ codes illustrated within the book - and so were not as enthralled as many other readers.

Admittedly, the writing isn't classic and the ending is as generally written a bit of an anti-climax, but as stephengrant wrote on 4/7 - I'd be interested to read people's ideas of a better ending.

Concluding, it isn't classically written, but very cleverly and perhaps appeals to a wider range of audience, including readers who like a bit of information integrated into their reading.

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Yes I agree the hype was just that. a good read but more like the book of the film rather than the film made around the book. I visit Paris off & on so knew that areas he was writing about.

CJ

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I thankfully watched the Tony Robinson debunking program before reading this dreadfully-plotted and appallingly written book! Dan Brown makes up & misuses words, can't even get places in Paris in their correct geographic location (I think Langdon leaves the Louvre by car & it takes him 10 minutes to get somewhere that's 30 seconds' away on foot), the characters were cardboard cutouts, the ending was so stupidly predictable & cheesy too, and it's exactly the same plot as Angels & Demons, AFAICT!

Apparently there are signs up in the Louvre now that explain to all the 'DVC is gospel truth' people that the P&S on a window somewhere have nothing to do with the Priory of Sion, that they're a commemoration of the creator of/person who paid for the windows...

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I read the Da Vinci Code a long time ago right after the controversy came out. I enjoyed it a lot, never lost in mind that it was pure fiction.

 

I am with you Cootisms it bugs me too when an author makes mistakes describing places. I also read "Angels and Demons" I found it a real nail bitter full of plots, thrilling chases and descriptive clues. I didn't find any similarity between the two books like you did. But again Brown is not the best of writer around.........

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I thoroughly enjoyed the Da Vinci Code when I read it ages ago (before the hype) but then I'd already been warned about the clunky writing. What really did get me were the descriptions of Paris which read as if they had been lifted from a not very good guidebook, no feeling whatsoever that he had ever been there and stood on those steps himself.

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I gave this my best shot but I didn't get past page 30(?) of the illustrated edition. I know what the Eiffel Tower looks like so I don't need a photo of it.

 

It did nothing for me, and reminded of that Antarctica book I read by Mark Reilly.

 

Literally.

 

I never did bother to read far enough to wonder why he started one line 'Oh!' and the next line 'O!' - it's almost as if there wasn't a spare aitch in the second anagram.

 

I really wanted to hit someone with the book as I returned it to the library. Some librarian, because no one would complain, they'd just see which book it was and put it down to an occupational hazard.

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I finally read the Da Vince Code while I was on holiday last week. I've been going through a bit of a reading draught since last December, and I hoped that a reading list of books needing little to no concentration might get me back on track. Unfortunately, the DVC wasn't the book to crack that.

 

While I was reading, I did feel like I was engaging with the characters, but as soon as I put it down I didn't really care any more! As I went on I found more and more excuses to put it down.

 

Honestly the book was way better than the movie, but I guess that is to be expected.

Well, I definitely won't be getting the DVD then!

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