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The Da Vinci Code

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Harvard professor Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call while on business in Paris: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been brutally murdered inside the museum. Alongside the body, police have found a series of baffling codes. As Langdon and a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, begin to sort through the bizarre riddles, they are stunned to find a trail that leads to the works of Leonardo Da Vinci – and suggests the answer to a mystery that stretches deep into the vaults of history.

 

Unless Langdon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine code and quickly assemble the pieces of the puzzle, a stunning historical truth will be lost forever…

 

 

RRP: £6.99, <a href ="http://www.thebookplace.com/bookplace/spring2005.asp?CID=BGO733" TARGET="_blank">The Book Pl@ce</a> Price: £4.89

 

Just click on book jacket

<A HREF="http://www.thebookplace.com/bookplace/display.asp?ISB=0552149519&CID=BGO733" TARGET="_blank">

<IMG SRC="http://213.253.134.29/jackets/m/055/0552149519.jpg"> </A>

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I was recently given a copy of the Da Vinci code as a present and, having heard lots of enthusiastic comments about it, was rather looking forward to reading it. What a disappointment, then, to find this novel to be predictable in its plotting and with characterisations that would be scarcely credible on the set of Eastenders. No doubt the author is not complaining, having sold millions of copies already but the whole book reeked of an effort cynically churned out for the inevitable Hollywood adaptation. Fortunately, it was so laughably simplistic I got through it in a couple of days!

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While I agree with you that the characters are not particularly well fleshed-out, I thought the plot hung together well enough. I only wish I had thought of writing a similar novel myself after reading "The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail", from where much of the detail of the book originates. I think that much of the buzz that the book has attracted comes from those who have not previously been aware of the theories in "Holy Blood" and have come across them for the first time in "The Da Vinci Code".

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I kept reading just to know what happened but, basically, rubbish! And some people really believe all that sect stuff - that's what worries me (but not too much). I have a feeling all his other books will be much the same - does anyone know?

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I kept reading just to know what happened but, basically, rubbish! And some people really believe all that sect stuff - that's what worries me (but not too much). I have a feeling all his other books will be much the same - does anyone know?

 

I'm with you Sue, can't believe people rate it so highly unless they are like us and read it because of the hype but weren't impressed. I thought I was going to like it, as I like this sect stuff, but I don't believe it. I just wanted a good story that hung together but this was so corny and over the top, a mish mash of ideas - very disappointing.

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I'm with you Sue, can't believe people rate it so highly unless they are like us and read it because of the hype but weren't impressed. I thought I was going to like it, as I like this sect stuff, but I don't believe it. I just wanted a good story that hung together but this was so corny and over the top, a mish mash of ideas - very disappointing.

 

I am with you both. Really poorly written pulp. It struck me that the author was writing an outline for a film rather than a novel. The twits like it though.

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Sue -

 

"I have a feeling his other books will be the same - does anyone know?"

 

I haven't read the Da Vinci Code, but I have read (under duress) Angels & Demons, and here is a precis:

 

Harvard professor Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: a cutting-edge scientist has been brutally murdered. On the body, is found a baffling brand. As Langdon and a gifted Italian scientist, Vittoria, begin to sort through the bizarre riddles, they are stunned to find a trail that leads to ....

 

Sound familiar?

 

It was, incidentally, every bit as dire as you all say The Da Vinci Code was.

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I'm trying to look at the time I wasted in reading this dreck in a positive light. It is a wonderful example of how not to write. :rolleyes: Unfortunately many people seem to miss the most important point about it. It's FICTION.

 

Cas

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Controversially (it would appear!) I actually quite liked the Da Vinci Code... although I have to agree that it wasn't particularly well-written (it does read more like a film script, not particularly "literary"). However, I did enjoy the plot, it kept me interested. I actually read this book whilst on holiday, it only took a week to get through it. If you're looking for a page-turning light read (ie. good for holidays, swith off your mind) then this is it.

 

Incidentally, I also read Digital Fortress by Dan Brown... if you don't like the D.V. Code, then don't read it, as I thought the D.V.Code was better! Digital Fortress was lacking in any sort of plotworthy 'oomph'.

 

Hope I'm not the only one who likes it!! :P

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I also thought it was terrible - it reminded me of the sort of "adventure" stories I used to read as a kid, only they usually had better characterisations and slightly less ludicrous plot developments. There were simply far too many convenient coincidences for the plot to be in any way credible. And I'm sure that everyone could see the way the story was going to end up a hundred pages before the end of the book!

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:)

 

 

 

I must be a total moron - I loved The Da Vinci Code.

 

 

Dan Brown has certainly upset a lot of people (CNN last night); maybe

Opus Dei are paying the detractors?

 

O.K. so I'm joking, but, as a one-time Catholic, nothing about "Holy Mother Church" surprises me.

 

My first posting, and now I shall probably be drummed out of the group.

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I find it fascinating that a book which sold, I am reliably informed, 82,000 copies in a single week last week should be disliked by so many readers. Is it just a backlash for something popular? Or do people resent being sucked in to buying a book they don't really like?

 

It's a bit like Captain Corelli's Mandolin, which is perhaps the last time the UK got 'swept along' into all reading the same book at the same time. That had one of the worst endings of any novel I've ever read. I'm building up slowly to starting a thread about it in 20th Century Novels - 1960-1999, but I'm still fuming about it over five years later.

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We read this for my reading group, The Books & Booze Readers, and it went down a bit better than it has here! ;)

Generally people liked it, although there was a certain element of predictability towards the end.

I found that his other three books were exactly the same, but were readable, didn't require too much brain power, and had enough tension to keep me interested.

Thought I would go against the grain! :P

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Sue -

 

"I have a feeling his other books will be the same - does anyone know?"

 

I haven't read the Da Vinci Code, but I have read (under duress) Angels & Demons, and here is a precis:

 

Harvard professor Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: a cutting-edge scientist has been brutally murdered. On the body, is found a baffling brand. As Langdon and a gifted Italian scientist, Vittoria, begin to sort through the bizarre riddles, they are stunned to find a trail that leads to ....

 

Sound familiar?

 

It was, incidentally, every bit as dire as you all say The Da Vinci Code was.

 

yes, all his books are the same. My favorite is Angels & Demons, probably because it was my first taste. Da Vinci Code fell short, in my opinion. And I wonder how deeply he delved beyond --what was it? Holy Blood, Holy Grail?

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Read both the DVC and A&D :eek:

 

The "religious history" stuf contained is interesting enough, although it does stretc things often (anything that winds up fundamentalists of any sort is OK with me!)

 

However, the style of writing is appaling, the characters characatures and no real descriptive text.

 

Each book is written in the style of short ten minutes chapters (ideal for those "smallest room" reads) ending on a cliff hanger...

 

This makes me thing it was writen with an American TV series rather than a film in mind as the style just fits in so well with the comercial breaks.

 

After reading each of the books I was left thinking of Johnny Rotten's famous quote at the Sex Pistols last gig in san Francisco - "Ever get the feeling that you've been cheated"

 

However, worse still is the horrendous market in "spin-off" publications

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After reading each of the books I was left thinking of Johnny Rotten's famous quote at the Sex Pistols last gig in san Francisco - "Ever get the feeling that you've been cheated"

 

You know, Uke I think that's it. This was an idea with so many possibilities and the execution was so appalling. And yet I kept reading it. :confused: In fact I couldn't put it down. :rolleyes:

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I don't really think that you can brand someone a twit for liking a book that you don't. Also the fact that it is written in very short cliff hanger chapters is a positive thing for people who are new to reading or who struggle with it. Dan Brown has helped my fiance really enjoy reading for probably the first time ever.

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njcfyi, every Forum needs at least one arrogant sod who thinks he/she is better than the norm. At least we now know who's made first pitch for the position on here! :)

 

Nothing else to say, haven't read DVC.

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If I could act as peacemaker for a moment. If a twit likes a book, that doesn't necessarily mean that anyone who likes that book is a twit. So I don't think WW was calling every who likes The Da Vinci Code a twit.

 

To put it another way: let's say all idiots like Shrek. It doesn't follow that the only people who like Shrek are idiots. Some very sensible people might like it. Or some people who are only slightly idiotic.

 

I believe it's called a false syllogism. I just looked on Google for an example of a false syllogism and this was top of the list: God is love, love is blind, Ray Charles is blind, therefore Ray Charles is God.

 

Does that help?

 

(Thought not.)

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I read The DVC and I thoroughly enjoyed it. At the time I read it, I wanted a simple page-turner adventure story that would keep me reading, and that's what I got.

 

I do think that part of appreciating any book is to apply the right criteria, based on the author's aims and intentions. Otherwise one might as well say 'Pride and Prejudice' is sucky and dull because there aren't any big set-piece action sequences in it with strafing combat air-craft and some Nazi spy intrigue thrown in for good measure. Or that King Lear doesn't contain many good gags. DVC doesn't have any very deep, well-drawn characters, but then again I don't think it is meant to have. E.M. Forster is very good for deep characters, but doesn't have any interesting puzzles to solve. I try to find the merits of each author's work, and take what positives I can from each.

 

I don't think it makes any sense to try and assess someone's intelligence based on whether they like or dislike a given piece of art or literature or music, and I think it would be sad if the Online Book Group allowed discussions to degenerate into that kind of asinine twaddle. I may or may not be a twit. If anyone who knows me thinks I am, then so be it -- I am way to old to care about such opinions either way. But I do have an honours degree in English Literature, I did like the DVC, and I do know that taking the author's aims and intentions into account is part of assessing the merits of any book.

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I really liked it! I thought the plot was really good and moved forwards well; it was impossible to put down. I know it's not realistic or anything, but not many books are. I enjoyed this book and the other Robert Langdon one - Angels and Demons - more than the other ones. I though that Langdon was an easier character to get to know.

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I've heard nothing but good things about "The Da Vinci Code". Unfortunately, a friend ruined the end for me, so I was very pleased. :rolleyes: But apparently there's alot more to the story, I think I'm getting it for Chrimbo from someone... well, hopefully :D

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NOT REALISTIC??? You were trying to persuade our RE teacher to believe how REAL it was ... :P

Havn't yet read it but I'm getting it for Chrimbo, and, for the most part, I don't care how unrealistic books are. As long as the plot is good and at least some of the character's are likeable I enjoy them.

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