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A book will always have a sensory tactile pleasure to it which an electronic device can't ever replicate.

 

I've read a few books on Kindle and the experience was fine (though when I want to quickly read a chapter, it becomes a pain to click on the icon, wait a thousand years for it to load, then click on the book I want, then wait another thousand years before the thing comes up).

 

And I agree with the article about having a better sense of mapping where you are with a real book. There's a sense of knowing where, both in terms of the chapters and the book as a whole, certain paragraphs and sentenced are, and how deep into the book you are. Kindle tells me I'm 61% into a book but it still doesn't mean very much to me. Whereas a physical book gives you a constant sense of knowing where you are. 

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I don't like the way you can't just flip to and fro in a Kindle. When my book group was reading 'Three Men in a Boat', my husband suggested I could probably get it free for the Kindle from Project Gutenberg. I rejected this, because it's totally the wrong medium for this book. You want to be able to flip through 'Three Men in a Boat' to find the bit where Harris sings a comic song, or the bit where they try to open the tin of pineapple.

 

It's also a pain in the neck when the detective story prints a diagram of the house layout on page 42 which you need to keep referring to.

 

On the other hand, if I bought every book I read there wouldn't be room in the house for me. Normally I use the library, but in lockdown my Kindle was a lifesaver. It's brilliant for taking on holiday, too. The entire works of Dickens in your handbag!

 

Don't forget Project Gutenberg, too. You can get books there that aren't in print at all.

 

If I read a book through once, I don't think reading it on paper or on the Kindle would make any difference to how much of it I remember. A paper book I am more likely to pick up and dip into again, so I might remember it better that way, but I'm not going to do that if it's gone back to the library.

Edited by Heather
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Good points all. 

 

I prefer paper books - and mine are just about moving me out of house and home! I'll need to read faster - but there are some books that are only available on e-book (Emile Zola's The Rougon McQuart series, for example).  I have read full e-books and like Hux found it frustrating to have to switch on and click on the icon then click again on the book that I left and I very much hate not knowing where I am in a book.  I have the complete works of Dickens on my Kindle but I purchased a paper copy of the Pickwick Papers because it gave me a list of characters to get a hold of and I ended up flicking to the back to consult the notes too.  Thus, I also don't like the fact that it's more difficult to flip back and forth on an ebook and one thing that I've found is that I like picking up the book I'm reading and I can see the title and author on the cover so that I know where I am altogether.  Whether I remember more reading a paper book than I do a Kindle, I can't really say. 

 

Interesting, though.

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Have you got a Kindle, or something else? On my Kindle, I switch it on and it immediately opens at exactly where I was last.

 

One reason they can't give you a page number is because you can change the print size, which is a huge advantage. I love old books and found a copy of 'The Daisy Chain' by Charlotte M. Yonge in a charity shop. I was thoroughly gripped by the story before I realised that the tiny print was giving me headaches! It was a shame, because it was a beautiful book, but I gave it to another charity shop and downloaded it to my Kindle instead.

 

My father suffered from macular degeneration and could no longer read his newspaper. My brother bought him a Kindle, arranged for the paper to be delivered to it each morning, and the problem was solved.

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I have tried an E-reader type thing, can't remember which make, but definitely wasn't for me. I still prefer having the physical book. But having said that I do read a lot of books on audio, so no physical ownership there. But I do think in years to come if my arthritis gets worse and holding books becomes painful or uncomfortable then I may have to try electronic again. As for the subject of the article, I can concur re the GPS. I used to drive for a living, all over UK, used to just look at a map and away I would go. never got lost and if I had to go back again I knew the way. Now with GPS I can go somewhere 2 or 3 times and still forget the route. Of course that could just be getting older but I don't think so. I think the article is right, I don't pay attention as much to road numbers and landmarks when I'm using the Sat Nav. 

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1 hour ago, Heather said:

Have you got a Kindle, or something else? On my Kindle, I switch it on and it immediately opens at exactly where I was last.

 

One reason they can't give you a page number is because you can change the print size, which is a huge advantage. I love old books and found a copy of 'The Daisy Chain' by Charlotte M. Yonge in a charity shop. I was thoroughly gripped by the story before I realised that the tiny print was giving me headaches! It was a shame, because it was a beautiful book, but I gave it to another charity shop and downloaded it to my Kindle instead.

 

My father suffered from macular degeneration and could no longer read his newspaper. My brother bought him a Kindle, arranged for the paper to be delivered to it each morning, and the problem was solved.


I bought an Amazon Fire tablet 8 just to read Kindle books because my 10” tablet was getting too heavy for the length of time I read. It does take a while to fire up and then I have to open the app but I could always leave it and see what happens. I did have an actual Kindle and I sent it back, one charge didn't last a week the amount I read and it took 3 hours to charge it. 
 

I found the same too small print size in a paper book, this year, and bought the kindle version to adjust the text (which was already set for me). I do read Kindle books and am not against them, I just prefer paper.

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That reminds me.

 

I'm currently reading Black Beauty on Kindle and every now and then there'll be a name of a person or a street but it will be blank (or a solid black line) such as 'I went to meet him on B------- Street and etc.'

 

I've noticed this before with other classics I've read on Kindle but never known why.

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14 hours ago, hux said:

That reminds me.

 

I'm currently reading Black Beauty on Kindle and every now and then there'll be a name of a person or a street but it will be blank (or a solid black line) such as 'I went to meet him on B------- Street and etc.'

 

I've noticed this before with other classics I've read on Kindle but never known why.

 

I've seen that too and I don't know why. Plugging it into the search engine didn't get me much either.

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Jane Eyre has street names and even some towns blanked out, not sure why either, and that's in book form.  I assume Charlotte Bronte didn't want a particular area identified for whatever reason.

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On 26/05/2021 at 21:50, lunababymoonchild said:

A book you remember a Kindle you forget

 

This popped up on my FB page, is anybody interested in discussing it?

I think that's absolutely true. I know I read much faster with an e-book, ergo I don't concentrate as much. I prefer real books, there's a pleasure in seeing unread books lined up on the bookshelf, a printed list in my Kobo library just doesn't have the same feel. However I do enjoy my Kobo, I like being able to fit 50 unread books in my handbag knowing that I'm going to have plenty of choice on a long journey without my arms being weighed down by several paperbacks and I'm sure in later years as my sight gets worse I'll really appreciate being able to enlarge type.

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13 hours ago, lunababymoonchild said:

 

I've seen that too and I don't know why. Plugging it into the search engine didn't get me much either.

 

I found this. Apparently it's common in literature in general but I'd honestly only ever noticed it when reading a kindle book.

 

http://wormhole.carnelianvalley.com/on-the-reasons-for-censoring-names-and-places-in-victorian-literature/

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10 hours ago, hux said:

 

I found this. Apparently it's common in literature in general but I'd honestly only ever noticed it when reading a kindle book.

 

http://wormhole.carnelianvalley.com/on-the-reasons-for-censoring-names-and-places-in-victorian-literature/

 

Very interesting, Hux.  I have noticed it in paper books but didn't notice enough if it wsa just Victorian literature.

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The commentators in that link seem to think such names as '-shire' was a kind of censorship. It strikes me it was just a literary convention. Nowadays the convention is to  make up a place name such as Borsetshire, even though we all know there is no such county in England, but then it was different.

 

The original writer on the link suggests it was because readers were so unused to novels that they might not be able to tell fact from fiction, and the commentators expressed surprise. Does anyone remember the fuss over 'The Da Vinci Code'? Any number of readers assumed it must be true that Jesus married Mary Magdalene and had a child (which could have happened, but there is no evidence for it at all). All forgotten now, thank goodness.

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