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Silver is the follow up to Chris Hammer's Scrublands - one of the best books I read last year. Silver takes place not long after the events in Riversend in Scrublands. Martin Scarsden has been holed up in Sydney writing a book about what happened while Mandy has moved to Silver Bay, a town on the NSW coast,  where she is about to inherit a house. Martin, book finished, comes to join her, walks into her rental, fnds a freshly stabbed body on the floor and Mandy sitting in shock, hands covered in blood.

 

Naturally she's the obvious supect, Martin is determined to prove her innosence but it's tricky especially as Martin has history which he hasn't told Mandy about yet.There are parts of the plot which stretch belief, especially why Martin hasn't told Mandy about his past, and this book doesn't have the power and raw energy of Scrublands. That said it's still an excellent read, very fast paced, I read it until 1.30 in the morning and then woke up early so I could finish it, haven't done that with a book for ages, so I have no hesitation in recommending it.

 

I was sure Mr HG had already done a post on Silver but I've searched and searched and couldn't find it.

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On 05/04/2020 at 20:26, Viccie said:

I was sure Mr HG had already done a post on Silver but I've searched and searched and couldn't find it.

 

No - it's not one I've read. I have seen it in the bookshops but there's something about it just didn't grab me the way Scrublands did. 

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On 22/04/2020 at 13:12, MisterHobgoblin said:

 

No - it's not one I've read. I have seen it in the bookshops but there's something about it just didn't grab me the way Scrublands did. 

 

 

Ii read it a few months ago and was disappointed. Too much content about the coastal geography which served to reduce any momentum and there wasn't much of that to start with.

 

 

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