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1 hour ago, lunababymoonchild said:

Old Masters, Woodcutters, Three Novellas all by Thomas Bernhard

Very cool! I’ll be interested to hear what you think. I haven’t read any of these. 

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My most recent trip to Dublin last Wednesday

 

Clean - Juno Dawson

Property - Lionel Shriver

Happiness - aminatta forna

Hotel silence - audur ava olafsdoittir

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Omitted to mention : The Blood by E S Thomson, third in the Jem Flockhart series, and The 4 Pillar Plan: How to  Relax, Eat, Move and Sleep Your Way to a Longer, Healthier Life, Dr Rangan Chattergee.

 

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The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

 

 

 

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Added 5 this week

 

Belladonna - dasa drndic

Story of a short sighted adolescent - mircea eliade

The bear and the paving stone - toshiyuki horie

Pride and prejudice - Jane Austen

Shatila stories from peirene press (collection of 9 essays from refugees of shatila refugee camp

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Lew Wallace was a Union General during the U.S. Civil War.  Ben-Hur ended up being the best-selling American novel of the 19th Century, surpassing even Uncle Tom's Cabin.   

 

Wallace fought at the Battle of Shiloh, which is one of the big--and therefore terribly bloody--battles of the American Civil War.  Wallace received a lot of criticism of how he handled the battle, but the blame has since been at least somewhat removed from him.  After the Civil War, he served briefly in the Mexican Army, as the territorial governor of New Mexico, and as a diplomat to the Ottoman Empire.  A lot of the men who served in the Civil War, particularly on the victorious side, had very interesting post-war lives.   John Wesley Powell, who explored the Colorado River and wrote stunning books about it, lost most of his right arm at the Battle of Shiloh (wonder if he blamed Wallace), then undertook tons of exploration in western North America (later to become the western United States).  He was very interested in the American Indians and gentle in his descriptions of him (no "blood-thirsty savage" language) and in conservation.   He reminds me a bit of Robert FitzRoy in those qualities.

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30 minutes ago, Binker said:

Lew Wallace was a Union General during the U.S. Civil War.  Ben-Hur ended up being the best-selling American novel of the 19th Century, surpassing even Uncle Tom's Cabin.   

 

Wallace fought at the Battle of Shiloh, which is one of the big--and therefore terribly bloody--battles of the American Civil War.  Wallace received a lot of criticism of how he handled the battle, but the blame has since been at least somewhat removed from him.  After the Civil War, he served briefly in the Mexican Army, as the territorial governor of New Mexico, and as a diplomat to the Ottoman Empire.  A lot of the men who served in the Civil War, particularly on the victorious side, had very interesting post-war lives.   John Wesley Powell, who explored the Colorado River and wrote stunning books about it, lost most of his right arm at the Battle of Shiloh (wonder if he blamed Wallace), then undertook tons of exploration in western North America (later to become the western United States).  He was very interested in the American Indians and gentle in his descriptions of him (no "blood-thirsty savage" language) and in conservation.   He reminds me a bit of Robert FitzRoy in those qualities.

 

Wow!  It does say best selling novel in the world on my copy so that will be the reason.  Looking forward to i.  Thanks for the information Binker

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On 6/23/2018 at 15:35, lunababymoonchild said:

Quiet: The power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, Susan Cain, Amazon kindle e-book.

 

 

I love this book Luna. I just bought a sort of follow-up - not by the same author, but it says it's a follow-up to Quiet, which focuses on social anxiety and how to overcome it. Very un-self-helpy which I love.

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4 hours ago, Hazel said:

I love this book Luna. I just bought a sort of follow-up - not by the same author, but it says it's a follow-up to Quiet, which focuses on social anxiety and how to overcome it. Very un-self-helpy which I love.

 

Sounds interesting, Hazel

 

Steppenwolf, Herman Hesse

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Because I'm possibly a bit of a lunatic, I've just added two Christmas-themed mystery novels to my TBR pile for December.

Jerusalem Inn by Martha Grimes, and A Christmas Malice by John Bainbridge.

 

 

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I have just been given one of the Journeys' Through England In Particular series, for my birthday, by my grandsons. As we are now living on the south coast it is the Coasting edition, and it looks as though it will be a really good "dipping into" book.

Opened at random, the first page I found was the one about the Shipping Forecast, with map, which made me very happy!

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I've placed my pre-order for the paperback edition of The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton.  It sounds so intriguing, and I can't wait to read it.  Goodness knows when, though!  I have 100+ unread books already on my shelves...

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On 19/06/2018 at 15:48, lunababymoonchild said:

Ben Hur, Lew Wallace.  I had no idea that this was a book!  This copy is so old that it doesn't have an ISBN number.  Love it!

 

That’s interesting. I bought Ben-Hur last year, but it’s still on my shelf waiting to be read. Hoping to start it when the days get shorter. 

 I didn’t know it was a book either, having seen Charlton Heston in the film numerous times, I always thought it was an original screenplay. It intrigued me enough to find out if the film was actually based on a book.

 

Waterstones had two paperback versions. The one I bought is published by Herperus Press Ltd - Is the ISBN number important? I’m new to a book forum - am I supposed to give it?

 

Edited by Loretta

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4 minutes ago, Loretta said:

 

That’s interesting. I bought Ben-Hur last year, but it’s still on my shelf waiting to be read. Hoping to start it when the days get shorter. 

 I didn’t know it was a book either, having seen Charlton Heston in the film numerous times, I always thought it was an original screenplay. It intrigued me enough to find out if the film was actually based on a book.

 

Waterstones had two paperback versions. The one I bought is published by Herperus Press Ltd - Is the ISBN number important? I’m new to a book forum - am I supposed to give it?

 

 

 

The ISBN number is not essential nor required on this forum. I mentioned it to show how old the book that I have is - I have an app that lists my books by ISBN, amongst others, so that I can keep a track of my TBR.  

 

Welcome to the forum btw

Edited by lunababymoonchild

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