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Found 8 results

  1. Over the last several months I have been reading one of the most talked about pieces of feminist literature from the Victorian era. Admittedly, it has taken me a long time to finish this masterpiece but it was so worth the wait. I spent the entirety of this novel with my heart throbbing in my chest as Hardy depicted the horrific lives of women in the 1800s with such honest brutality. I have been dying to write this blog post to explore my thoughts on this book which is so arguably relevant today, especially during this week's light on sexual harassment.
  2. Tess of the d'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy - 1891 I couldn't really find a short synopsis describing enough of the story without revealing too much. Tess Durbeyfield is a girl from a poor family who is thrown into a difficult situation without any fault of herself. This will determine her later life which is not a happy one. This novel certainly belongs to the tragic ones. A friend of mine said it was the most horrible book she ever read. But usually we disagree about books. As we do this time. I loved this novel. Of course, I didn't like everything that happened to Tess or the other
  3. I am about a quarter of the way through this book it having been recommended to me by a friend. Having read a number of Thomas Hardy books in the past she remembers this of all of them as being her favorite. Having read many books by Thomas Hardy myself I have to admit that I am not sure so far why she was so keen on this book in particular. As with all Thomas Hardy books the book is beautifully written. So far the reader has met few but the main characters as the story takes place in a very small community. The main characters are Elfride the daughter of the local vicar, the vicar him
  4. I've just finished reading The Woodlanders , which I hadn't re-read since the ice age, and I was somewhat surprised at how ponderous I found Hardy's style in the novel. Very long-winded, more circumlocutions than you can shake a stick at! They struck me as particularly inappropriate given the elemental nature of much that Hardy is writing about. However, I was interested to come across the passages concerning the 1857 Divorce and Matrimonial Act, on which, of course the last part of the plot hinges. I had forgotten all about that, but shouldn't have since I use extracts from the Act as a conte
  5. Restored Thread Hazel 12th December 2006 04:29 PM Bathsheba inherits a farm and with it 3 suitors determined to marry her, but she makes a bad choice and with this choice comes great tragedies. The plot as simple as I can make it. This was my first Hardy book and I will definitely go on to read more. I really loved the names that Hardy gave to his characters: Gabriel Oak; the solid, decent, dependable shepherd, Farmer Boldwood; the middle-aged, stern and forthright farmer, and Francis Troy, the philandering rake who is also a soldier. It is the events that appear out of char
  6. Synopsis: The passionate Eustacia Vye feels herself imprisoned, living in her grandfather’s isolated cottage on wild Egdon Heath. 'To be loved to madness - such was her great desire', and to live a life of idleness and luxury in some more entertaining and vibrant setting. Her ex-lover, Damon Wildeve wasn’t able to provide these things for her, and before the story begins has gone off to marry local girl Thomasin Yeobright, who adores him. Her Aunt disapproves of Wildeve, and has previously forbidden the banns. She had hopes of her niece marrying Clem, her son - and ‘The Native’ of the titl
  7. I'm almost done with this book and like it or not I keep relating to the comment in this thread http://www.bookgrouponline.com/forum/showthread.html?t=3884&highlight=jude+obscure that reading Jude is 'like being hit in the face over and over again'! It really is, I am reading it and constantly groaning at what new misadventures befall Sue and Jude, shouting at Sue for being so pig-headed and at Jude for being so weak. That said, I wouldn't say I dislike the novel - I've been compelled to keep going back to it, I want to find out what happens in the end, although I'm dreading it really
  8. Based on this thread, this is week one's discussion. Everyone is welcome to participate, though this is primarily geared towards people who appreciate poetry but have not studied it in any academic programme. <blockquote>The Voice, Thomas Hardy Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me, Saying that now you are not as you were When you had changed from the one who was all to me, But as at first, when our day was fair. Can it be you that I hear? Let me view you, then, Standing as when I drew near to the town Where you would wait for me: yes, as I knew you then, Ev
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