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Found 2 results

  1. In Walking Home, Simon Armitage describes walking the Pennine Way, unusually from north to south, as he lives near the southern end. He sets off without any money, intending to rely partly on the kindness of strangers and partly on trading readings of his poetry in exchange for bed and board. It works very well, although giving poetry readings after a day's walking seems less and less fun as the walk goes on. I do a bit of walking and really enjoyed this. He is very honest and self-deprecating about his own feelings and responses. He certainly doesn't glamorise it. It is particularly good on the people he meets / walks with, and on the landscape. I loved the ending, and it will stay with me for a long time, especially at tough walk moments. I read it on the Kindle, and that annoyed me, because the pictures, while included, didn't display very well, and I think they would have added something. I'm also sure that the paper book would have had a map and it would have been easier to keep track of where he was.
  2. I'd like to make a start. The Simon Armitage pdf has 3 poems and some suggested questions. Does anyone have any idea what the second one means (the question, not the poem)? Does the name Damien have special significance? Damien wants to keep the snowball intact so that he can play a childish joke. The 'housewife' has been taking little bits for various uses, until it's all gone. The uses are all connected to being a housewife, but they're totally implausible. It would be possible to use bits of frozen snow to make an ice pack (though frozen peas would be better), but no one would use dirty snow for any of the other uses, especially when they already own a chest freezer! Presumably Damien never opens the freezer - cooking is her job - but has he really not noticed his wife's gone until it's time for his annual prank? I suspect I'm not meant to notice these things, but to find some deep metaphorical meaning instead. Perhaps the 'true scald of Antarctica's breath' is the love there should be between them, but for him it's just something from the past, preserved but never looked at, and hers has dribbled away in domestic duties. What does anyone else think?
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