Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Liam McIlvanney'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • THE BOARD ROOM
    • Welcome to BGO!
    • Board Business
    • Site News & Support
  • GENERAL FICTION
    • Central Library
    • 21st-Century Fiction
    • 20th-Century Fiction
    • Pre-1900 Fiction
    • Poetry and Drama
    • Writers' Corner
  • FICTION GENRES
    • Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
    • Fantasy & Myth
    • Historical & Romance
    • Horror
    • Science Fiction, Graphic Novels & Manga
  • NON-FICTION
    • Arts & Media
    • Biography & Autobiography
    • Food & Drink
    • History, Politics & Beliefs
    • Homelife & Lifestyle
    • Life, The Universe & Everything
    • Reference & Humour
    • Sport
    • Travel
  • CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS
    • Children & Young Adults - General Discussion
    • Read To
    • Read With
    • Read Alone
    • Read On
  • BGO GROUP READS
    • BGO Book Group Meeting Point
    • The Dead - James Joyce
    • Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
    • Me Talk Pretty One Day - David Sedaris
    • Things Snowball - Rich Hall
    • Food
    • Crossing to Safety - Wallace Stegner
    • Book Group Archive
  • ANYTHING BUT BOOKS
    • General Chat
    • Films, Television & Radio
    • Music & Culture
    • Language & Learning
    • Games, Quizzes & Links
  • SUBSCRIBERS' AREA
    • Subscribers' Offers
  • Sherlock Holmes

Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Current Book


Biography


Location


Interests


How did you hear about this site?

Found 1 result

  1. Fairly closely based on the Bible John murders in Glasgow in the 1960s, The Quaker offers a fictitious resolution to these unsolved murders. Three women have been slain in Glasgow, meeting their killer in the Barrowlands ballroom and never making it home. The third victim had shared a taxi with her stocious sister and The Quaker; the sister offered the best – and only – hope of catching the killer. But after a year there had been no breakthrough and DI Duncan McCormack is sent into the investigation to determine whether or not to scale it down. This leads to a complex story that is, on the face of it, a police procedural – with red herrings, corruption, distrust and a jewel heist – and part a social commentary on the changing social values of the 1960s. The Glasgow of the time had not yet reconciled itself to the abolition of the death penalty or decriminalisation of homosexuality. Single mothers were still scandalous, Catholics were still routinely disadvantaged, pubs were still not places that nice people went. In many ways, the killer represented a reaction against the encroaching modernity. The novel is well written, had a suitable number of red herrings and creates a great sense of place. The sense of time, however, doesn’t always feel quite right. I’m not sure 1969 Glaswegians wore cagoules and worried about neds – maybe they did, but just that seed of doubt can dispel a setting. The plot is quite lurid and appears to have been driven backwards from the ending. I’m not sure in the real world that a set of actions would ever have led to the consequences as they unfold. But it’s a good yarn, nonetheless, and might go some way to reigniting curiosity about the real Bible John. ****0
×