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  1. The Daughter of Time was the first book I read by Josephine Tey, and is still my favourite. Inspector Alan Grant of Scotland yard is confined to a hospital bed, and being an active man the enforced immobility chafes. He is challenged to use his intellect to occupy himself, and becomes intrigued by a portrait of King Richard III. Grant thinks Richard has too sensitive a face to have been responsible for killing the Princes in the Tower, and with a friend to help with the research, sets out to 'prove' that Richard is innocent. Although Grant's initial premise, that Richard doesn't look like a murderer, is rather dated (the book was published in 1951), the arguments he sets out (or rather that the author sets out) in his 'evidence' to support the case for Richard's innocence is convincing. I recommend this book both as a mystery novel, but also as a lightly presented piece of historical research.
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