Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Josephine Ferguson'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • THE BOARD ROOM
    • Welcome to BGO!
    • Board Business
    • Site News & Support
  • GENERAL FICTION
    • Central Library
    • 21st-Century Fiction
    • 20th-Century Fiction
    • Pre-1900 Fiction
    • Poetry and Drama
    • Writers' Corner
  • FICTION GENRES
    • Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
    • Fantasy & Myth
    • Historical & Romance
    • Horror
    • Science Fiction, Graphic Novels & Manga
  • NON-FICTION
    • Arts & Media
    • Biography & Autobiography
    • Food & Drink
    • History, Politics & Beliefs
    • Homelife & Lifestyle
    • Life, The Universe & Everything
    • Reference & Humour
    • Sport
    • Travel
  • CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS
    • Children & Young Adults - General Discussion
    • Read To
    • Read With
    • Read Alone
    • Read On
  • BGO GROUP READS
    • BGO Book Group Meeting Point
    • The Dead - James Joyce
    • Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
    • Me Talk Pretty One Day - David Sedaris
    • Things Snowball - Rich Hall
    • Food
    • Crossing to Safety - Wallace Stegner
    • Book Group Archive
  • ANYTHING BUT BOOKS
  • SUBSCRIBERS' AREA
  • Sherlock Holmes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Current Book


Biography


Location


Interests


How did you hear about this site?

Found 1 result

  1. Josephine Ferguson is anything but a celebrity, but she tells an engaging story of her life and times. This memoir of the daughter of a cavalry major in the Indian army begins in 1916 and ends in the 1950s, telling of the author’s grandfather and her prestigious family connections with lords and viceroys, including Gordon of Khartoum. Josephine, his modest grandaughter,however, owing to 'a complete lack of 'push', was to descend into the shallows of extreme serfdom on a typewriter.' It begins rather like a family scrapbook not aimed at the general reader, but soon the wry accounts of private schools and falling finances start to amuse and engage. It is as much a cultural history as a family document, always keeping an eye on public events and changing attitudes to dress, manners and education. The writer constantly deplores the passing of old ways when, it seems, standards were high and people were reliable. She can get quite cross about ‘young people, these days’ sounding off thus:‘It seems that inverted snobbery has taken such a hold on this country that anyone who speaks correct English is suspected of being a Tory and therefore BAD.’ Despite bouts of invective against falling standards, the author is frequently amusing, especially over her many humble jobs as office girl, typist and, eventually, ship’s purser - all the time on the lookout for a husband. Full of jokes and good fun, this is an entertaining nostalgic read.
×
×
  • Create New...