Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Ian Shipley'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • THE BOARD ROOM
    • Welcome to BGO!
    • Board Business
    • Site News & Support
  • GENERAL FICTION
    • Central Library
    • 21st-Century Fiction
    • 20th-Century Fiction
    • Pre-1900 Fiction
    • Poetry and Drama
    • Writers' Corner
  • FICTION GENRES
    • Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
    • Fantasy & Myth
    • Historical & Romance
    • Horror
    • Science Fiction, Graphic Novels & Manga
  • NON-FICTION
    • Arts & Media
    • Biography & Autobiography
    • Food & Drink
    • History, Politics & Beliefs
    • Homelife & Lifestyle
    • Life, The Universe & Everything
    • Reference & Humour
    • Sport
    • Travel
  • CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS
    • Children & Young Adults - General Discussion
    • Read To
    • Read With
    • Read Alone
    • Read On
  • BGO GROUP READS
    • BGO Book Group Meeting Point
    • The Dead - James Joyce
    • Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
    • Me Talk Pretty One Day - David Sedaris
    • Things Snowball - Rich Hall
    • Food
    • Crossing to Safety - Wallace Stegner
    • Book Group Archive
  • ANYTHING BUT BOOKS
  • SUBSCRIBERS' AREA
  • Sherlock Holmes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Current Book


Biography


Location


Interests


How did you hear about this site?

Found 1 result

  1. A Gravedigger’s Tales Ian Shipley This slim volume of anecdotes by a gravedigger has a macabre fascination. The tone is humorous and practical throughout, beginning with its bright zany cover. The gravedigging occupation is apparently beset with many problems: wrong size hole, wrong shaped coffin, drunken diggers, waterlogged ground, misplaced diggings, eccentric client requests being but some of its tribulations. Shipley takes all these in his stride, finding in them ample scope for a good laugh There is much in this unpretentious book to amuse the general reader, but it is no work of literature/ On almost every page we find hackneyed expressions: panic buttons being pressed, adrenaline being pumped and so on. There are also scores of annoying tags, ‘to say the least,’ being a favourite. Tired expressions, such as ‘at the end of the day’ and ‘if I say so myself,’ soon begin to pall. Nevertheless, publisher and author have done an excellent job of proofing and editing. This is a well-produced little book, exploring unfamiliar territory with frankness and humour. Shipley is well worth a read - and for the author a rest after over 3,000 digs in Notts and Lincs.
×
×
  • Create New...