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  1. This enchanting memoir of a Cambridge Childhood by Charles Darwin's granddaughter was first published in the 1950's and has remained in print ever since, quite something for a little known book and proof that it continues to delight sucessive generations. Gwen's father was Darwin's second son, a professor at Cambridge, and her book is a wonderful evocation of a fairly free upbringing (her mother was American and had 'liberal' theories about raising children - for instance the Darwin children were occasionally allowed to run around barefoot). Her style is dry, witty and self-deprecating, there are some real laugh out loud scenes, a disastrous picnic described near the end of the book for instance, and the text is illustrated by clever and amusing pen drawings done by Gwen herself who studied at the Slade. I don't know anyone who hasn't enjoyed this book, male or female. Edit - The illustrations are actually woodblock. Gwen and her husband revitalised the art of using woodblocks.
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