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Found 14 results

  1. From the blurb on Amazon - "'One of the most brilliantly inventive writers of this, or any country' (Independent) turns his unique eye on the dark end of the 1960s in his enthralling new novel, a story of music, dreams, drugs and madness, love and grief, stardom's wobbly ladder and fame's Faustian pact." In the beginning there is desperation, the searching for sustenance for the body and the soul. There are trials and tribulations, soaring ethereal moments of musical connection, personal growth, awakenings and chemical enhanced imaginings. All fairly standard fare for a ban
  2. Slade House is a short novel comprising five sections, each set on the last Saturday in October, starting in 1979 and then at nine year intervals. That means the last section is set on 31 October 2015. That's TODAY!!!!!! Wow! If only the novel were as good as its timing. Because, in truth, Slade House is a bit of a disappointment. It is set in the same world as Bone Clocks, with the same semi-super-natural beings implacably opposed to one another; the same conceit of innocent bystanders getting their moment to tell their story before being sucked into the bigger plot, the same smattering
  3. What is a Bone Clock? A bone clock is a person, maturing and ageing. Starting as a weak and helpless baby, becoming strong, getting wise, getting frail, dying. And because you can tell a person's stage of life just by looking, they are a bone clock. Simples. In The Bone Clocks, just as in Ghostwritten, we find a series of separate stories with a thread of connection, But whilst Ghostwritten jumps across space, The Bone Clocks jumps over time - although there are a fair few different locations too. There is a common thread - far more so than in Ghostwritten or Cloud Atlas, but there is
  4. A reluctant voyager crossing the Pacific in 1850; a disinherited composer blagging a precarious livelihood in between-the-wars Belgium; a high-minded journalist in Governor Reagan’s California; a vanity publisher fleeing his gangland creditors; a genetically modified ‘dinery server’ on death-row; and Zachry, a young Pacific Islander witnessing the nightfall of science and civilisation – the narrators of Cloud Atlas hear each other’s echoes down the corridor of history, and their destinies are changed in ways great and small. In his captivating third novel, David Mitchell erases the boundaries
  5. Found this a struggle to start with, partly because historical literature is just not my genre these days and it's set in Japan in 1799. I also found the number of incidental characters tricky to keep track of. Once I got past those two issues, what a fantastic read this was. All of Mitchell's hallmark brilliance with language, a very sympathetic protagonist, a refreshingly original plot and such vivid imagery throughout. When I got to the end, I genuinely felt as though I had been on an emotional journey with the characters. It's nothing like Cloud Atlas in form, but is not dissi
  6. This was DM's first novel: a series in nine parts which could be read as standalone stories as each one comes to its own conclusion, with the first being reprised at the end. However, each is linked to another, or others among the chapters - character(s) reappear in other stories, either as bit parts or in more meaningful roles. There are also recurrent themes throughout the book. He starts in Tokyo and talks about it being so big, no-one knows where it stops. This enormity is brought down to the level of an individual involved in the Sarin gas attack. Indeed, many of the chapters have enormo
  7. Rescued Thread Mungus 16th June 2006, 02:55 PM Black Swan Green, the new offering from David Mitchell is a total departure from his previous novel, Cloud Atlas. This is a much more traditional book, telling the story of a year in the life of Jason Taylor, an average, middle class 13 year old with a stutter. It's 1982, so the year plays out against a backdrop of the Falklands War, union unrest, unemployment and Butterscotch Angel Delight. The Eighties setting was what attracted me to the book (being of an age with the narrator) but I was also worried that this would shape the book t
  8. Thank Goodness! I will admit to approaching this book with minimal enthusiasm, but I was prepared to put aside my predjudice against hyper-hyped books and enthuse if I thought the writing warranted it. Possibly, if you read it in really big chunks (maybe chapters 1-5, in one sitting, then chapter6, and finish with chapters 7-11 in one final sitting it might all hang together, but I found it very disjointed, and the difference in style/genre of the 6 stories was, to my mind rather gimmicky. The language used in the middle story was almost incomprehensible at the start, and then just becam
  9. I started this with The Time Travelers Wife and I think its good to get an overall feel for what we thought of the book. However I do think I need to do something about the time delay so I'll change the structure in future. ...........So here is the poll to gauge whether it gets the or the or even the I'm keeping the choices simple again. The next one will be wider but I might need more smilies!
  10. I've just started this and am about 100 pages in, so I'm into the first Louisa Rey story. I found the language and sentence structure of the Adam Ewing section quite contrived. While I accept that 19th century writing generally uses a more complex structure I found this imitation a bit over the top. The Robert Frobisher letters tended to ramble on a bit but I suppose that is the nature of letter writing. So far my feelings are a bit mixed............I'll stick with it.
  11. I have just thrown the book across the room! I was already annoyed by Tim Cavendish's train journey. First of all, getting 'past Saffron Walden' is a little disingenuous, implying as it does that the line runs somewhere near the town. It doesn't, it is nowhere near. Then Adelstrop? This may be my mistake, perhaps there is an Adlestrop on the way to Hull, but the only one I know is in Gloucestershire. But , Aurora House I just couldn't stomach!! I work in a Residential Care Home for the elderly, and train staff in various statutary subjects. Cavendish is subject to various types of abu
  12. I read CA a month ago and said then it needed another reading at least to get some of the nuances I missed the first time. Unfortunately for me, CA has come up too soon for me consider re-reading it, so I'll have to go with what I remember. I don't recall every one of the six main characters having the same tattoo. I wasn't watching out for it, which is one of the reasons it needs at least one more read. Did I miss some? I thought one of the motifs running through the book was that the six all shared certain characteristics (and may even have been the same "soul").
  13. I have just finished the first chapter, and was greatly irritated when it finished in the middle of a sentence. As it is widely known that the first half of the book consists of the beginning of six stories that continue in reverse order in the second half, ending with the story it started with, I sneaked a look at the start of the last chapter. Yes, the sentence continues there. A quick glance at the next story revealed that the second section seems to be a continuation of the letters in the earlier part. The Temptation is to read the whole of each story straight off, as though it was ju
  14. A reluctant voyager crossing the Pacific in 1850; a disinherited composer blagging a precarious livelihood in between-the-wars Belgium; a high-minded journalist in Governor Reagan’s California; a vanity publisher fleeing his gangland creditors; a genetically modified ‘dinery server’ on death-row; and Zachry, a young Pacific Islander witnessing the nightfall of science and civilisation – the narrators of Cloud Atlas hear each other’s echoes down the corridor of history, and their destinies are changed in ways great and small. In his captivating third novel, David Mitchell erases the boundaries
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