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hux

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Everything posted by hux

  1. January Review posted on January 10 - The Map and the Territory (Michel Houellebecq) 7/10 March Review posted on March 3 - The Book of Disquiet (Pessoa) 9\10 Review posted on March 23 - A Confederacy of Dunces (John Kennedy Tool) 6/10 April Review posted on April 1 - If on a Winters Night a Traveller (Italo Calvino) 7/10 Review posted on April 19 - The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (Carson McCullers) 8/10 Review posted on April 27 - Norwegian Wood (Haruki Murakami) 8/10 Could have sworn I read something in February. 🤔
  2. Great. Don't take on more than you need to though. Running this place is obviously more complicated than it looks.
  3. I've posted quite a few reviews in the last year. A brief look at them would suggest very little interaction (even when other people have read the book). People clearly don't enjoy being too verbose in response to reviews so maybe a like button would help increase interaction?
  4. See, I didn't know that. Just bought four books from Amazon. Went straight to their site though. I will now endeavor to use the banner.
  5. Can someone explain how the 'bill's are paid? It was made to sound like they get paid if there are more posts. How does that work? I only read and review a book once a month roughly but could certainly post more in other areas.
  6. I feel a bit guilty swanning over there and telling them to be more like BGO 😂 But yeah, the personal blogs aren't to my tastes. It feels almost intrusive.
  7. Yes, all true. I dislike the book blogs. You actively have to search through someone's personal reading to see if they're reading something you've also read. Not sure what the point of that is. It's a 'forum.' The idea is surely to encourage discussion rather than ask people to hide it away. Anyway.
  8. You mean that the site is slow to react? Every time I log in there, it seems to be endlessly buffering or something. I also dislike the general setup. But otherwise it seems okay.
  9. Can't find a thread to bump on this so starting a new one. This was one of the most wonderful reading experiences I've ever had. The book is no classic but it's wonderfully written and profoundly engaging. I honestly couldn't put it down. The story is fairly straight-forward and involves a man named Toru Watanabe reminiscing about his youth in the late 60s. After his best friend, Kizuki, commits suicide he becomes closer with Kizuki's girlfriend Naoko. They eventually have sex and Watanabe goes to university. Here he meets several characters, most notably Nagasawa and
  10. A superb exploration of loneliness and the roles we are forced to play. The book revolves around a deaf/mute named John Singer. After his friend (also a deaf/mute) is put into an institution, Singer moves into a new room where, slowly but surely, four characters come to view him as a kind of spiritual leader. They go to him to tell of their woes, their frustrations, their dreams. Because he can't speak, he is forced into the role of listener (whether her wants to be or not) and they quickly transform him into a blank canvas for their worldview. Unbeknownst to them, however, Singer also has
  11. That's^ interesting about The Great Gatsby. I also read it late in life and the book's reputation might have been a factor. I was possibly expecting too much. That being said there are other books which huge reputation that lived up to them. For me, it was just... okay. Books you didn't finish is a good additional question. I quit halfway through Moby Dick and Jane Eyre. Not because I wasn't enjoying them but because I just lost interest, got distracted by life, put them to one side.
  12. Not sure I understand this question. You mean books you grew out of, or books you initially liked but, putting some thought into it, concluded weren't that great. The only thing that qualifies is Atwood's Blind Assassin. I enjoyed reading it and when I finished I thought it had been great. As the weeks and months went by, however, I started to think it was actually quite poor, overly melodramatic, and somewhat inconsequential and gimmicky.
  13. Just finished this. It's a very original book where you, the reader, become one of the characters. You buy a book but it has typos so you take it back to the shop where you meet a woman, also wanting to read the book, and then you speak to a university professor with her about the book, then another professor, then a publisher about a different book, then a writer about another book, then you begin a relationship with the woman, then you go to another country to find the complete manuscript... and so on etc. Sadly, that didn't work very well for me because after the fi
  14. Before the forums closes, tell me... 1. Your favourite book. Journey to the end of the Night. 2. Saddest book you ever read. The Leopard. 3. Book you read a paragraph or two from every now and then. The Book of Disquiet. 4. Best opening line you ever read. The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new. 5. Most overrated book. The Great Gatsby. 6. Book you read because of a review you saw here. The Book of Ebenezer Le Page (I've also bought The Heart is a Lonely Hunter).
  15. Across the gateway of my heart I wrote 'no thoroughfare.' But love came laughing by and cried I enter everywhere.
  16. Another disappointed customer here. I enjoyed the book for the most part but wasn't necessarily blown away by it. The first third, where we are introduced to the wonderfully grotesque globule of man known as Ignatius J. Reilly, was a lot of fun to read. This man just utterly overwhelms you with his absurd, pompous affectations and over-the-top character. Then, however, I found my interest slightly waning, especially when we're introduced to the rather pointless characters (if you ask me) who frequent the 'Night of Joy' club such as Lana and Darlene and (worst of all) Jones. All he
  17. I was also somewhat disappointed. Have posted a review.
  18. hux

    Dachshunds

    All done by a professional. This is as good as I get.
  19. According to the Talmud, it's 30 September, 2239.
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