Jump to content

Artegall

Members
  • Content Count

    38
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Artegall

  • Rank
    Founder Member

core_pfieldgroups_99

  • Biography
    23, Journalist
  • Location
    London
  • Interests
    Cricket
  • How did you hear about this site?
    Friend is founder

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Bigger than Hitler, Better Than Christ Rik Mayall's autobiography.
  2. Actually, as it happens, somewhat ironically... I've been writing a book! Have to finish it by January but the pressure's off a bit now. Expect to see me popping up in Writers' Corner when it's done
  3. Hello one and all, apologies for the prolongued absence...been busy. Anyway, delighted to see we won't have any more misery over the Summer. On the one hand, playing a good team like Croatia without your first choice back four or strikers is pretty tough. On the other, McClaren was useless and shouldn't have got the job, the team are a bunch of overpaid arrogant fools, I can't stand the national side's 'supporters', and generally I feel shooting is too good for the lot of them. So I'm a bit torn on the issue.
  4. You log on at 12.45 in the morning when you have to be up at 6am...
  5. Be ranked #1 in the world at something. Anything. Go to Glastonbury (which I'm attempting to do this year) Read Ulysses Be written about in 'Heat' magazine. DJ at a live venue (I'm working on this one this year too). Be given the keys to a city. Go to: South East Asia, Australia, China, New York, Morocco, and about 100 other places. Finish reading all of Dickens. Skydive Hanglide Meet David Bowie and talk to him about his music Duet on a rap with Eminem Now, what was Jimmy Saville's address?
  6. I actually did some work for once. Not an experience I'd care to repeat.
  7. Artegall

    It's back!

    *surveys the debris* *sniffs the air* Blimey. It was all green fields round here once. Better try to dig up some threads then...
  8. I've never really 'got' this book - it's massively self-indulgent tripe, as far as I can see. I'm being harsh because I've read and loved pretty much every other book by Evelyn Waugh - his early stuff, in particular, is absolutely amazing. Scoop and Vile Bodies are really savage and funny books.
  9. Funnily enough, I was working on this only last week. Here's Wilde's, predictibly lyrical: ALIEN TEARS WILL FILL FOR HIM PITY'S LONG-BROKEN ERN, FOR HIS MOURNERS WILL BE OUTCAST MEN, AND OUTCASTS ALWAYS MOURN. Shakespeare's is somewhat morbid: Good frend for Jesus sake forbeare, To digg the dust encloased heare! Blest be the man that spares thes stones, And curst be he that moves my bones. You can see this one at Monk's House, Sussex, where Virginia and Leonard Woolf used to live; Virginia's buried in the garden: Against you I will fling myself, unvanquished and unyielding, O Death! And the other one I like is Christopher Wren's. Where's he buried? Guess... LECTOR, SI MONUMENTUM REQUIRIS CIRCUMSPICE (Reader, if you seek his monument look around.)
  10. The smallpox is really interesting...I remember that in the book the way Dickens shows Esther discovering her scars is really moving; I think she's alone. But the show did it well I thought. Charles Dance is getting better and better, too!
  11. "Whilst some may argue that Dickens is really too big a morsel to be swallowed by text, the Great Inimitable himself began working life as a short hand writer," said Professor John Sutherland of University College London, who is backing the project. "He would, I suspect have approved of the brevity if nothing else." Who on earth is this cretin? I take it he's making a buck or two somewhere along the way...
  12. Yeah it's also the best biography - much better than Agent of Evolution. I guess you'll have read it already but 'Love all the people' is a fantastic collection too, and the epigraph left at the end is very moving.
  13. A PITY beyond all telling Is hid in the heart of love: The folk who are buying and selling, The clouds on their journey above, The cold wet winds ever blowing, And the shadowy hazel grove Where mouse-grey waters are flowing, Threaten the head that I love. The Pity of Love W.B. Yeats
  14. North American Fiction 3 - Raymond Chandler (interestingly was taught by the same guy as PG Wodehouse - they write quite similarly, I think) Science Fiction 1 - Philip K Dick short stories.
  15. I've had the misfortune to have a stalker, who either had de Clerambault's or something approaching it. I read the book a year before the stalking started, and suddenly realised that my stalker's behaviour was very familiar indeed. So I have to say that the novel works for me as a piece of trad. realism in that regard; one wonders if McEwan has had a similar experience himself. The intellectual flaws being pointed up here are interesting, however - this is very much the problem with lots of postmodern narrative: when it's not kneeling at the altar of science it's being flippant.
×
×
  • Create New...