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Slowreader

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Everything posted by Slowreader

  1. I agree with all of the above - it is well crafted and there is no padding - out. Buy- to - let investors in the UK will no doubt identify with Wilhelm's despair as his investment falls through the floor
  2. I quite enjoyed it until the ending, which i thought was ridiculous. Same with 'Saturday'. I may try him one more time though.
  3. Early on, Holloway was faintly amusing but then he had to completely overplay it with his rent-a-quip 'humour' - started believing his own publicity. Probably the funniest episode was his leaving of Plymouth 2 days after professing his love for the club........then almost crying on tv after taking Leicester down. Muppet.
  4. will this silly man never shut up?
  5. I agree this is an absolutely outstanding book. I was drawn to it by the title, which is smewhat poetic in itself. I appear to be in a minority who guessed the nature of the tragedy early on, but that did not diminish the horror as it - slowly - unfolded. A book that stays with you, this.
  6. I've had most of the songs from The Wedding Present's 'Take Fountain' album bashing away in my bonce for a few weeks now. Right now my brain's playing 'It's For You'.
  7. if they are not fond of sharing why are they your friend?
  8. Provoked? Not likely. Bored? Certainly. So what if whatever person / paper thinks this is the top 50? Why should anyone care? Presumably its to get people writing in to argue for their choices so they have to buy the blasted paper every day to see if they are in it!
  9. happy new year to all (sorry I can't make this as fun as Momo's)
  10. i think that what began as a charming series of books has become a mildly exploitative industry, wringing every last drop of revenue from his memory. The books are being updated, fine, but please no more coffee table books or walking with wainwright tv programmes. I expect the old curmudgeon would have disapproved.
  11. This book made a massive impact on me. The sheer brutality of the conflict and the numbers of lives shattered is astounding.
  12. I first had to read this at school but failed to grasp anything other than the chain of events which it describes. I don't know quite why I went back to it a couple of year ago but I'm glad I did as I found it superb.
  13. 1. Iain Sinclair: London, City of Disappearances (current) 2. Peter Ackroyd: Thames, Sacred River *** 3. Gillian Tindall: The House By the Thames **** 4. Michael Moorcock: Mother London **** 5. Bruce Chatwin: On the Black Hill ***** 6. Will Self: The Sweet Smell of Psychosis ** 7. Andrei Makine: A Life's Music *** 8. Virginia Woolf (David Bradshaw,ed.): Carlyle's House and Other Sketches** 9. David Means: Assorted Fire Events **** 10. Joseph Roth: Hotel Savoy*** 11. Maxence Fermine: The Black Violin** 12. Penelope Fitzgerald: Offshore*** 13. Penelope Fitzgerald: The Bookshop *** 14. Sherwyn B Nuland: Leonardo da Vinci ** 15. Penelope Fitzgerald: The Golden Child **** 16. Alexander Barron: The Lowlife ***** 17. Sukhdev Sandhu: Night Haunts - A Journey Through the London Night*** 18. James Kelman: An Old Pub Near the Angel **** 19. Peter Ackroyd: Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem **** 20. David Peace: The Damned Utd *****
  14. the scabbies are back in the premiership next season. oh joy
  15. well I understand that Mark Delaney of Aston Villa has a doctorate in thermonuclear physics and used to work as a rocket scientist...in fact, given his almost total absence from first team action he might do better to go back to it
  16. why ridicule them for this? perhaps some of them read to their kids?
  17. vain, vacuous and with a ridiculously contrived ending almost as bad as his 'Amsterdam' bleeeagh!!
  18. agreed - especially what you call his acerbic delivery
  19. I can recommend the graphic version of Paul Auster's 'City of Glass' - its a stand-alone work intelligently drawn
  20. so, to demonstrate how slow i am....... 1. Dante - Inferno (started in 2006) 2. John Mc Gregor - If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things 3. Paul Auster, Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli - City of Glass (graphic) 4. Merlin Coverley - Psychogeography 5. Paolo Maurensig - The Luneburg Variation 6. Mark Roseman - The Villa, The Lake, The Meeting: Wannsee and the Final Solution 7. Malise Ruthven - Fundamentalism: A Very Short Introduction 8. David Quammen - The Kiwi's Egg: Charles Darwin and Natural Selection 9. Steven Dorrill - Blackshirt: Sir Oswald Mosley and British Fascism 10.Catharine Arnold - Necropolis: London and its Dead 11. Iain Sinclair - White Chappel, Scarlet Tracings
  21. The whole of 'And the Days are Not Full Enough' by Ezra Pound: And the days are not full enough And the nights are not full enough And life slips by like a field mouse Not shaking the grass.
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