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Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte

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#61 OFFLINE   Apple

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:50 PM

Grace a88 Wrote:

I read Wuthering Heights for the first time when I was sixteen and didn't appreciate it at all. I found it difficult to get to grips with the dark characters and I found it hard to care about what happened to them. However I have since reread the novel a number of times and with each reading I seem to appreciate it more and more.


I am normally like that with dislikable characters and you don't much more dislikable than Heathcliffe but there was such an intensity and range of emotion there from hatred towards the people who had wronged him to his obsessive love for Cathy, which took on many guises, and yet somewho you can't help but feel a little for him despite his reprehensible behaviour, there are glimpses of kindness and compassion very briefly at points in the story and you are always left with the wondering of where he actually came from in the first place.

#62 OFFLINE   nonsuch

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 10:55 AM

Heathcliff is a sort of Gothic monster as well as a working-class hero taking revenge on the gentry. We are not expected to 'like' him, but to be overwhelmed by his power and personality. I think he's my favourite anti-hero beating even Satan in Paradise Lost.

#63 OFFLINE   Momo

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 07:08 PM

Perhaps that is why so many people just love it, and I really don't - they have vivid imaginatons, and I am just too literal and prosaic :rolleyes:

I think that's it. I'm not into fantasy or science fiction either. Or maybe there is a frame when you should read it, maybe in your twenties or even thirties, not too young any more, not too old, though I don't think so. Sometimes you might be too young but I don't think you can be too old to enjoy a book. I've read a lot of children's books with my boys and thoroughly enjoyed them. Can't say it works the other way around, though. ;)
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#64 OFFLINE   Tay

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 05:52 PM

Having read through the posts and if you don't mind me saying some of you are a bit obsessive about this book, or at least that's how it appeared to me.

I didn't like the writing, the characters or the story. This is neither the greatest nor the worst English language book, it's just another boring one!

#65 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:12 PM

if you don't mind me saying some of you are a bit obsessive about this book, or at least that's how it appeared to me.

Not at all, and isn't that true of most often cited 'favourite' books? Fans of a book (or film, band...) tend to be obsessive. And because something is cited as a favourite, it doesn't always follow that the thing is the best example in its class. A strange, inexplicable thing happens, an alchemy of sorts that creates favourites.

In fact it is often true that books that top 'favourites' will also top 'most hated' lists. Certainly true of Lord of the Rings. Not well-written and yet inexplicably a favourite, cherished book. I hate it.

Some of my favourites books or films don't stand up critically, but who cares?

#66 OFFLINE   Tay

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:38 PM

Not at all, and isn't that true of most often cited 'favourite' books? Fans of a book (or film, band...) tend to be obsessive. And because something is cited as a favourite, it doesn't always follow that the thing is the best example in its class. A strange, inexplicable thing happens, an alchemy of sorts that creates favourites.

In fact it is often true that books that top 'favourites' will also top 'most hated' lists. Certainly true of Lord of the Rings. Not well-written and yet inexplicably a favourite, cherished book. I hate it.

Some of my favourites books or films don't stand up critically, but who cares?


I agree with you Hazel that when we 'love' some work of art it can affect our critical judgement of it.

But I've had bad things to say about a few of books on this site and yet this is the one that someone (just happens to be yourself) has virtually immediately replied to my comment (most have had no comments). Which does lead me back to the fact that people who like this book tend to be more than normally possessive about it. I don't mind that they are, I kind of like that people 'love' something, especially a book, that much. I was just mentioning it. Perhaps I should have added a smiley face to soften the impact. :)

As for favourites not standing up to critical judgement well as you know I like Stephen King and I'm sure some people could have a field day with his work, but as you say who cares. :D

#67 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 07:36 PM

But I've had bad things to say about a few of books on this site and yet this is the one that someone (just happens to be yourself) has virtually immediately replied to my comment (most have had no comments). Which does lead me back to the fact that people who like this book tend to be more than normally possessive about it.

:D You could be right there. WH is possibly my favourite book.

But then I commented on your point that people tend to be obsessive about things they regard as favourites - I didn't try and defend the book against your criticisms of it! I found your point interesting. I think if I was more "obsessive" as you put it, I would have started countering your criticisms and possibly being a bit hysterical at your libel of a brilliant book! But then, I'm not a mad obsessive. Really, I'm not. I'm NOT OKAY?!

As for favourites not standing up to critical judgement well as you know I like Stephen King and I'm sure some people could have a field day with his work, but as you say who cares. :D

Damn right. Who cares. I like what I like and I don't give a rat's ass who dares criticize it!

#68 OFFLINE   Tay

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 08:42 PM

:D You could be right there. WH is possibly my favourite book.

But then I commented on your point that people tend to be obsessive about things they regard as favourites - I didn't try and defend the book against your criticisms of it! I found your point interesting. I think if I was more "obsessive" as you put it, I would have started countering your criticisms and possibly being a bit hysterical at your libel of a brilliant book! But then, I'm not a mad obsessive. Really, I'm not. I'm NOT OKAY?!

Damn right. Who cares. I like what I like and I don't give a rat's ass who dares criticize it!



Thank you, you made me laugh here :D :D

But I shall await, anticipate, pause in the full expectation of the correspondence from your lawyer! :)

#69 OFFLINE   dibs66

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 07:25 PM

I think I need to read this again as it seems to come off better after a second read.
I first read it before my first Yorkshire holiday, I was staying just outside Haworth; I bought WH and Jane Eyre and read WH first cos it was shorter!!
JE is definitely my favourite, I remember wanting to bang Cathy and Heathcliff's heads together. :)

#70 OFFLINE   nonsuch

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 10:49 PM

A marvellous and unique book. Could Emily Bronte have ever written another as good? I doubt it.

#71 OFFLINE   shauningt

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 09:19 PM

The character Heathcliff in the book "Wuthering Heights" by Emily Brontë is one of the most interesting characters in the book as he slowly deteriorates from a person into a shadow of someone he could have been. Heathcliff nearer the end of the novel shows pleasure in the pain of others and even harsher sadistic behavior, Lochwood the new tenant at Thrushcross Grange is greeted with this behavior when trying to leave the Heights in the storm:
"The vehemence of my agitation brought on a copious bleeding at the nose, and still Heathcliff laughed.'
This type of behavior is often linked with sociopathy. Heathcliff throughout the novel shows symptoms of being a sociopath. 
The first as just quoted is sadistic behavior in a minor way, nearer the end of Heathcliff it is worse, but another symptom is his grandiose sense of himself. Nelly tells us (Lockwood) as a child Heathcliff was brought home from the streets by Mr. Earnshaw.
This is not a happy event due to Mr. Earnshaw promising Cathy, Hindley and Nelly gifts from his trip, these not turning up due to Heathcliff. Mr. Earnshaw soon took a liking to his new son over his daughter and son. Heathcliff saw this and started to take advantage of Mr. Earnshaw, this is most likely due to Cathy and Hindley constantly tormenting him. This behavior can be seen in chapter 4:
"You must exchange horses with me: I don't like mine, and if you don't I shall tell your father of the three thrashings you've given me this week...'

This quotes also demonstrates the second symptom of sociopathy and this is child delinquency. At a young age, Heathcliff is extremely aggressive. Part of this could be explained by his street upbringing and again torment from Cathy and Hindley. He is already seeking revenge and cursing down on Hindley's downfall, which is extremely concerning for a child especially since he knows he can't say this in front of adults. The third symptom of Heathcliff's sociopathy is thinking the world is wrong not him. The third symptom of Heathcliff's sociopathy is thinking the world is wrong not him. This is seen many times throughout the book. This is extremely apparent after his violent beating with Hindley. After nearly beating Hindley to death and is called out by Nelly, Heathcliff blames Hindley for it due to the fact that Cathy is dead and he can't say her name, this can be seen as extreme grief or as psychopathic, either way, it is wrong and Heathcliff's fault. He also has no remorse after this beating, this is another sign of sociopathy:

"I gave him my heart and you pinched it to death and flung it to me, people feel with their hearts Nelly and mine has been destroyed!"

 

There are some areas in which Heathcliff does not fall into a sociopath, one of these areas is a capacity for love. The whole events of the novel happen because Heathcliff loves Cathy, although it is an obsessive love and debatable to be a real love, he shows devotion and platonic interest in Cathy:

"What kind of living shall it be when you are- (insinuated dead) oh god! Would you like to live with your soul in the grave?"

He also has a sense of shame. The only reason Heathcliff becomes rich is while ease dropping on Nelly and Cathy. If Heathcliff had not had shame he would not have cared if he was not as rich as Edgar Linton and would think that he was better in every sense. Instead, he runs away to make his riches:

"Having noticed a slight movement, I turned my head to him rising to  steal out, noiselessly."

again showing shame, he sneaks out rather than make a scene moments before leaving to make his riches in America.

 

Inconclusion Heathcliff is a shell of a person and is a personified demon, especially nearing the end of the novel. He does not show any knowledge of the meaning to the words, love, and care. As if those words died with Catherine. He took the lovely Wuthering Heights down with him in his degradation. He abused Hindley, Isabella and more but there is one character in the end that still looks up to Heathcliff and that is Hareton. Everyone see's Heathcliff as stone cold but Hareton still cares in the end, as a young boy he looked up to him. Hareton may show us a more hopeful side to Heathcliff that is not told to us by Nelly. 

Nelly gives us the evidence to a horrible sociopathy Heathcliff which may not be true.

 

 

 



#72 OFFLINE   megustaleer

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 10:46 PM

shauningt's post merged with this thread.



#73 OFFLINE   shauningt

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:00 PM

shauningt's post merged with this thread.

 

Hi! sorry for posting it to the wrong thread, new to the website and my report needed comments from people on the internet.







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