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mj_planet18

Christine

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Has anyone read this?

 

Does anyone think there should be a sequel?

 

I think Leigh is an amazing character, but why oh why, didi they have to spilt up at the end?!!!!

 

Oh and can anyone recommend some King novels for a massive fan of Christine, who has only managed to get halfway through other King novles?

 

mj

 

x x x x

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My days of being a Stephen King fan are long gone now, but favourites were always It, The Stand, Gerald's Game, Misery, Carrie, and Cujo.

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Why the loss of interest? If you dont mind me asking...

 

I don't mind you asking at all! Mainly loss of writing talent and loss of originality. I still appreciate the old favourites but the rest I think the world could do without.

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I'd have to agree with the recommendations above. "Cujo" is probably a good place to start. I'm a huge King fan, and I'd say "IT" and probably "The Stand" are his two best (IT is my all time favourite book). They're a bit long if you've given up on previous titles. Start with Cujo! Not too long, but a very good story.

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I loved Salem's Lot, very spooky and enjoyable. I really did struggle to put it down.
Yes, that's a good one too, very spooky, but the film kind of took the shine off the books for me. Needful Things, that's another great one too.

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Well i have copies of Carrie, Pet Semetary, Misery, From A Buick8, The Stand, Desperation, Black House, Cell, Insomnia and Needful Things.

 

I've started and given up on The Stand, From A Buick8 and Desperation.

 

But I do really want to read them all, and would like to get back into King, so which do you recommend i start with?

 

:P

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I've started and given up on ... From A Buick8

Don't worry about that one - it's rubbish.

 

which do you recommend i start with?

Carrie, possibly as it was his first to be published, then maybe Needful Things as it's a great story start to finish. Or Misery for the same reason.

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Well i have copies of Carrie, Pet Semetary, Misery, From A Buick8, The Stand, Desperation, Black House, Cell, Insomnia and Needful Things.

 

I've started and given up on The Stand, From A Buick8 and Desperation.

 

But I do really want to read them all, and would like to get back into King, so which do you recommend i start with?

 

:P

"Pet Semetary" is one of the earlier novels, and pretty creepy. It's a very good read!

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''From A Buick8'' and ''Hearts of Atlantis,'' I didn't enjoy. ''Christine'' and ''Carrie'' were great. However, a book I loved was his 'On Writing', a very candid autobiography with an insight to how his mind ticks.

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I'll start this by saying I'm a huge fan of King and have read most of his books (the only ones I haven't read are the small print runs or the only on kindle ones) and a few years back I decided, in between all the other books I read, to read all his stuff again in chronological order including the short stories. So this last week it was the turn of Christine.

 

Unfortunately I didn't enjoy it this time round, I found it far too long and think it would have been much better as a short story. The main characters are good enough but lacked any real meat to their bones. There were large parts of it I was just speed reading through just to get it finished. 

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This took me back quite a few years Tay when I was reading many of King's 'horror' books - I enjoyed them back then, Christine was the evil car wasn't she if memory serves?

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This took me back quite a few years Tay when I was reading many of King's 'horror' books - I enjoyed them back then, Christine was the evil car wasn't she if memory serves?

Yes that's right Momac  :)

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Christine was the evil car and I read the book right about the time my husband's first car tried to murder me with great regularity.  She would lurch into an intersection and then stall, hoping someone would hit me.  I called her Christine and my husband rarely rose to her defense.  She had overheated anytime we drove her above 45 miles per hour between San Francisco and Dallas.  That's a LONG way to go 45 mph and a lot of it is very uninteresting scenery.  She has been long gone from our lives, thank goodness.

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Christine was the evil car and I read the book right about the time my husband's first car tried to murder me with great regularity.  She would lurch into an intersection and then stall, hoping someone would hit me.  I called her Christine and my husband rarely rose to her defense.  She had overheated anytime we drove her above 45 miles per hour between San Francisco and Dallas.  That's a LONG way to go 45 mph and a lot of it is very uninteresting scenery.  She has been long gone from our lives, thank goodness.

Sounds like you're well shot of her Binker  :drive:

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Sounds like you're well shot of her Binker  :drive:

Very much so.  He took it to a dealership that advertises "we tote the note," which tells you how much money we made off of Christine.

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Very much so.  He took it to a dealership that advertises "we tote the note," which tells you how much money we made off of Christine.

I'd never heard that phrase "we tote the note" Binker, just googled it to find out what it meant. And yes your post now makes sense given your opinion of Christine!

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It's only used in the very cheapest car lots in poorer areas of town.  It was a terrible car--built at full size with a much smaller engine in order to make it more "fuel efficient."  My husband thinks the car dealer, who was a family friend and going to take care of him since he didn't have a father--screwed him over.  But he learned a lot from that experience.  I don't think we've bought a bad car or paid too much for it ever since.  It helps that we buy cars and keep them forever.  So it hasn't been that many.  

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A few years ago an accountant said to me that the best way to buy a car is either to buy new and run it 'forever' until it starts costing too much to repair or buy a three year old car and change every three years.

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