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The Theatre, dahling.


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#1 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:01 AM

Rather than resurrect the thread for Theatre Visits, I thought I would just start a new one for reviews and upcoming plays you have seen, or will see.


Last Saturday I finally got to see The Woman In Black at the (eugh) Kings Theatre, Glasgow. It really was superb and I loved the premise that Arthur comes to a theatre to learn how to tell his tale and then he and the actor act out the tale with the actor taking Arthur's part while Arthur plays all the inconsequential characters on the way. The appearance of the Woman, gave me quite a start and more than a few people in the audience spent the time screaming! The last time I saw such audience participation was at the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

It was very well done and I was quite in the moment of the play. Both actors did a grand job and the woman who played the Woman in Black scared the bejesus out of me. The only complaint I would have is that in the denouement when the
Spoiler
Still, it was a good show, and I managed to get the train home myself without any scares.

#2 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:46 AM

The appearance of the Woman, gave me quite a start and more than a few people in the audience spent the time screaming!

After seeing it a few times in the West End I twigged that actually a woman is planted at the back of the stalls to scream loudly on the first occasion, which then sets everyone off!

Glad you enjoyed it, Hazel - it's quite an experience, isn't it! I wonder if it's worth spoilering your comment about the ending, since I think it'll carry on doing the rounds for a while yet?

#3 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:50 AM

Done.

Really? I wondered why the first scream sounded so loud and piercing! Going to that show by yourself is brave indeed but I managed to keep my feminine emotions under wraps - jolting only slightly. I would definitely go again.

#4 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:02 PM

Going to that show by yourself is brave indeed but I managed to keep my feminine emotions under wraps - jolting only slightly. I would definitely go again.

Imagine going, as I did once, with a school party. Teenage girls = mass hysteria. Mind you, I sat with another male member of staff who grabbed my arm at one shocking moment. Obviously he just thought it was the armrest.

Yes, quite obviously...

#5 OFFLINE   Barblue

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:17 PM

Changing the atmosphere slightly, I went to see The Vortex at Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester last week. It stars Will Young and if I'm honest I only went to see him as I've followed his singing career since his Pop Idol days.

I went with few expectations to be honest. The idea of pop idols being able to act didn't strike me as viable, but I like the intimacy of the theatre in the round and was curious. I was pleasantly surprised.

Will Young is probably not he best actor I've seen, but he played the part well. Critics I've read have panned it because he was too 'effette' an homosexual. I didn't think that, but he may have refined the role over the few weeks it's been running. What did surprise me was his capacity to express his character more foribly at the climax of the play.

Apart from my 'idol' I have to admit the supporting cast was surperb. One of the parts was being 'read' because the actress was not available that day due to an accident - a phrase that still has me wondering. Presumably she was not a direct understudy. Despite holding a script throughout, she acted the part admirably and deservedly received an ovation from the cast at the end.

My only complaint is that I picked up a virus that day and have been full of a cough and cold ever since. But I did enjoy it and am glad I went.

#6 OFFLINE   megustaleer

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:41 PM

He was in Mrs Henderson Presents, which I saw on TV a short while ago. I knew I recognised his face, but it took a while to place him (I still had to resort to the Radio Times to confirm it, even when I came up with the name to the face)

He was quite good... just a little camp

#7 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 12:50 PM

He was quite good... just a little camp

Yes, I thought he was good too. It surprised me. I'm normally fairly curmudgeonly about 'crossover' artistes, but since he wasn't diabolical, as they usually are, I was impressed. It'll be interesting to see where he goes with this and which field will prove to be the more dominant.

#8 OFFLINE   chuntzy

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 06:29 PM

I saw a good production of As You Like It at The Crucible on Saturday. It's not one of my favourite Shakespearean comedies but this was an excellent production with Eve Best doing superbly as Rosalind. The set was both minimalist and imaginative at the same time, if that makes sense. I must say, though, that except for Twelfth Night I do prefer on stage the tragedies and history plays.

#9 OFFLINE   Jen

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 07:59 PM

Changing the atmosphere slightly, I went to see The Vortex at Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester last week.

I saw Rupert Everett in the same role in the West End about a hundred years ago. I can remember it being quite a performance, but not a single thing about it. Apart from Rupert being rather lovely. I find the idea of Rupert Everett and Will Young in the same role rather odd. Although didn't Everett try to launch a singing career once...?

#10 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:05 PM

I find the idea of Rupert Everett and Will Young in the same role rather odd.

Well, it's consistent on one level, at least...

(Nearly a good start to my moderating career - wasn't concentrating on which button to press to quote and instead pressed my new 'edit' button on your post, Jen. Had already highlighted a great swathe to delete for the quote when I realised! D'oh!)

#11 OFFLINE   Jen

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:23 PM

Well, it's consistent on one level, at least...

Perhaps Noel Coward wrote a clause insisting on it in his will!

#12 OFFLINE   megustaleer

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:38 PM

pressed my new 'edit' button on your post, Jen. Had already highlighted a great swathe to delete for the quote when I realised! D'oh!)

:naughty:It's very tempting, isn't it?! :angeldevi Oh. the feeling of power! :nono:

#13 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 08:52 PM

Oh. the feeling of power! :nono:

More the feeling of stupidity in my case! :dunce: :rolleyes:

#14 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 01:50 PM

I went to see a monologue play of Consider The Lilies at the Citizens Theatre last Friday night. Every Scot of my generation will remember being taught the book by Iain Crichton Smith at school. About the Highland Clearances, it focuses on the tale of Mrs Scott in the 1700s as she is being evicted from the croft that she has lived in since she was born there. Her parents and her grandparents before her also resided there. Over the course of a week or so she reflects on milestones in her life in the croft and seeks help from the village minister - who refuses to help. It is a very sad story.

Anna Hepburn played Mrs Scott and was the only actor on stage. She delivered a 90 minute monologue which covered the whole story. It was a remarkable feat. How she remembered the whole script and without an interval I do not know but it was superb.

If you get a chance to see this, you really must grab it.

#15 OFFLINE   Minxminnie

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 01:55 PM

I went to see a monologue play of Consider The Lilies at the Citizens Theatre last Friday night.

If you get a chance to see this, you really must grab it.


Aaargh! No! I had to teach that once. It was sooo depressing! I hated it and so did the kids (not surprisingly, since I had so little enthusiasm!) Did you enjoy it at school, Hazel? I think it's a really important book - just not much fun.

#16 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 02:06 PM

Did you enjoy it at school, Hazel?


Not remotely. I only went to see the play because my hubby loves the book, but I was really surprised - the play was excellent and makes me want to go back and read it again.

#17 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 04:59 PM

Anna Hepburn played Mrs Scott and was the only actor on stage. She delivered a 90 minute monologue which covered the whole story. It was a remarkable feat. How she remembered the whole script and without an interval I do not know but it was superb.

I saw Ian McDiarmid at the Almeida in the early 90s reciting Tennyson's In Memoriam, which was at least 90 minutes. I was extremely impressed!

Am I to assume it was the fiendish English who tossed Mrs Scott off her croft? I'm afraid I know nothing of the Highland Clearances but am quite happy to add it to the collective guilt.

#18 OFFLINE   megustaleer

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 06:11 PM

I'm afraid I know nothing of the Highland Clearances

You ought to read this book, then.
It's a while since I read it, and although it seemed somewhat dull and plotless as novels go, it was interesting and informative as a window on a piece of history I knew nothing about. (Although it is supposed to contain a number of inaccuracies)
It was also very moving, and is very short ;)

#19 OFFLINE   Hazel

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:10 AM

Am I to assume it was the fiendish English who tossed Mrs Scott off her croft? I'm afraid I know nothing of the Highland Clearances but am quite happy to add it to the collective guilt.


Not always the English David - mostly the wealthier Scottish landlords (often in cahoots with wealthy English). They cleared people from their crofts and burnt them down to make way for sheep farming. Sheep were considered more valuable for the export of wool and meat, than the crofters who mostly by that time were the elders who were not producing anything from their land. Many of the young that could have done so emigrated to America and Canada, as Mrs Scott's son does in the book.

The book is fairly dull - but it's saving grace is that it is short. The play is a much more interesting bet.

#20 OFFLINE   David

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:38 AM

They cleared people from their crofts and burnt them down to make way for sheep farming.

Ah, so part of the general process of enclosures? That's interesting, and sadly not very isolated in history as you look at the vast swathes of rainforest slashed and burnt for beef farming even now!

Thanks, Hazel.




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