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Dan

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About Dan

  • Rank
    Permanent Resident
  • Birthday 13/12/1960

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Vancouver, Wa.,US
  • Interests
    Love literary authors, preferably with wit, a sense of humor or at least a light touch. Into outdoor pursuits including but not limited to; Rock climbing, fishing, birding, lepping and oding.
  • Current Book
    Hopefully something interesting ????

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    Nelsondaniel59@yahoo.com

Recent Profile Visitors

930 profile views
  1. Complicity

    This was indeed a fantastic novel, as good ,in its way, as Wasp Factory, which is my only previous experience with Banks. I was particularly impressed with the layers of meaning, from the title to the murders, from the various relationships Colley has to his various addictions. My only problem with it was that it was so well plotted and consuming that I couldn't always slow myself down enough to appreciate the glorious and clever prose, and the spreading ripples of simile, metaphor, and allusion😏😉 . 5 stars!
  2. Lean on Pete

    I'll have to give this a shot, iff, since you said you liked it better than Motel Life, which showed promise but didn't deliver. Thanks for reminding me of this book!
  3. I just bought/borrowed/received...

    Sure thing. I'd be ready to start in a couple weeks.
  4. I just bought/borrowed/received...

    Doing all three would be a real project! 1065 pages all together! But it could be done, as long as we didn't put tight time constraints on it. Maybe @Binker would like to join in?
  5. I just bought/borrowed/received...

    That's cool! Found this handy edition in a thrift store a few years back. Sad to say it is still collecting dust upon a shelf😑
  6. Freelance Pallbearers by Ishmael Reed is a surreal satire on religion, politics, the American Dream, and anything else you might think of. It is told with the rhythm of improvisational scat jazz, and has an internal and infernal logic which has no counterpart in the so called real world. There is no particular plot, but there is a very loose framework ; SAM, dictator/fat cat and anti-messiah of HARRY SAM, has ensconced himself in the royal commode for 30 years. Only his minions and underlings have any contact with him. Bukka Doopeyduck is a wannabe acolyte of SAM's twisted religion, who constantly proselytizes for SAM. Eventually they meet. But even that summary probably detracts from this book. This is a glorious mishmash of a hilarious nightmare straight from the brilliant but disturbed subconscious of Ishmael Reed, and as such, really defies description. I found it best to just enjoy the ride and not get caught up in linear expectations. But if anybody else has, or does, read and understood this book, please tell me. Though my lack of understanding really didn't detract from my pleasure in immersing myself in Reed's world. It did help that it was only 154 pages long. 4 stars
  7. This was a good book, for what it was. There were some interesting parts about the development of Quantum physics, and some fun details about the people involved; Who knew Einstein was a horndog😂😏 But I wish it would've been more about ideas and less about personalities, especially since the author didn't delve deeply into those personalities. As non-fiction I wish this had been written by Sarah Bakewell instead of Sheilla Jones. But that is the reason why I don't read non-fiction very much. I really wanted someone who understood the people and the concepts so well that they could write dialogue between Einstein and Bohr, for example. I wanted interactions that felt true, even though they were imagined. I wanted depth that is simply not possible at this remove without moving away from dry 'facts' and into speculation and imagination. But I am glad I read it and I thank you for the recommendation, Binker!
  8. A to Z Game

    Keening klepto winds stealing heat from all they touch
  9. A to Z Game

    Glazings of glare ice gumming up traffic
  10. Apparently I missed some of the additional editions of this. Received a copy yesterday through interlibrary loan. Will be starting this today. Looking forward to to it!
  11. Wittgenstein's Nephew by Thomas Bernhard is a semi-autobiographical account of his friendship with Paul Wittgenstein, the son of Ludwig Wittgenstein's (the philosopher) first cousin. The book, written in one 100page paragraph, is a sustained rant, often funny, and always acerbic. It's targets are legion, though it's primary sacred cows are Viennese society and the medical profession. But he does give an interesting and well rounded assessment of Paul Wittgenstein, whose mental illness paralleled Bernhard's physical (primarily pulmonary) ailments, and he shows great honesty in his portrayal of both of them. There is nothing earth shattering here, but it is a thoughtful book, and to my lights an entertaining one. And a quick read to boot.
  12. A to Z Game

    Dark, dank days, downpour dumping deluges
  13. The New York Trilogy

    Very much enjoyed the experience of reading this book. I was captivated and intrigued all the way through each of the three novellas. And there isn't much to add to the excellent reviews upthread. I do wish there'd been more clues as to the true nature of the Stillman case, and as to why Fanshawe opted out of his life. Not because I expected the mysteries to be resolved, for early on it was clear to me that that wasn't the aim of the stories. But merely to give me some additional jumping off points for my own speculation. All in all a fascinating read! 5 stars!
  14. The Loser

    Thanks Luna. I'll be sure to post on Wittgenstein's Nephew
  15. The Loser

    Glad to hear you liked this, Luna. I'll definitely be looking to read it. What are the other books in the trilogy? Interesting to note the brevity of this work. Bernhard's first novel, Frost, my only previous experience with this writer, was at least a 1/3, maybe 50%, longer than it needed to be. And it told no discernible story. My next read will be Wittgenstein's nephew by this author. Thanks for the review!
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